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Exclusive Jason DeLucia Interview

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I have been trying to contact a lot of the fighters from the older days of the UFC, to see how the scene has changed according to the ones who were there in the beginning.

Jason DeLucia, 4 time UFC veteran, Pancrase veteran


1. What do you consider your greatest life achievement, Martial Arts
related or otherwise?

My greatest life achievement is my family. Everything else pales in
comparison. My life aside, the small events one after another lead me
whirlwind style. My greatest achievement might be the way I lived my
life which took me where it did. I follow the directions of the
unseen, and trust for results.


2. Is it true that when you fought Royce Gracie in Los Angeles before the
existence of the UFC, you were actually responding in person to a
challenge made by famous actor, Stephen [sic] Seagal?

It is true the reason I went to Los Angeles when I was younger was
that Steven Seagal had issued a challenge to all comers very publicly
in Black Belt magazine. So I went. I arrived in LA in February of
'92 and I went to his dojo and issued a written challenge response and
politely handed it to his chief instructor Matsuoka Haruo and waited,
and watched. I went to every class morning and night. The headmaster
explained that Mr. Seagal would not come even though my presence there
was legitimate. So for my time there I studied his system of Aikido.
Which was I think my true reason for being there. And by the way, God
bless Taka Sensei (Steven Seagal) for his work in movies. In particular,
"On Deadly Ground" is an indictment of this generation.


3. What did you think of your recent experience competing in Cage Rage?
How much has the scene changed, and how did you feel about your
opponent?

Cage Rage helped to teach me something about the sport as it is now
that the playing fields are more even with respect to general
knowledge, and it is that weight matters. Never an issue so much
before with so many divergent aspects of martial arts competing. And
that there is a science in cutting weight that can give a huge
advantage or create a huge disadvantage depending on the
circumstances. Royce made a fine display of the smaller guy beating
the bigger, but as knowledge and performance enhancement increased
there would naturally have to be weight limits. And even that is
"used" somewhat unscrupulously. It seems that the average guy in the
205 category is actually about 220-225. I saw my opponent Fabio
Piamonte at the weigh-in and he was big, but the day of the fight
fully hydrated he looked like a 6' gorilla. Personally, I don't like
the idea of cut weight but it's like a lot of other things, almost
everybody is doing it. The reverse side is also understandable, that
at 220 you face possible opponents at 260 and up. What can you do.


4. Most records list your first fight against Trent Jenkins. How many
actual fights had you fought before taking him on at UFC 1? (not
counting street fights of course)

Prior to Trent Jenkins in UFC 1, all of my fights were always dojo
matches of some sort, and/or street matches agreed upon. i.e., no dojo
would host it so we'd go find a sand pit somewhere or a parking lot.
Personal note, fighting in sand is the pits. As kids this is what we
did for fun. The idea of keeping a record never occurred to us. My
longest undefeated streak was about 20 fights.


5. You had wins at UFC 1 and 2, but neither were shown due to their
being fights to decide alternates in the event. How did it feel going
into the fight with Royce at UFC 3, knowing the fans were behind him,
and didn't know of your success yet? Were you intimidated at all?

I fought Royce in UFC 2 and at that time I was as green in the
business as you could be. I really didn't know enough to feel
pressure of his fan base. More so the pressure came from the games
played behind the scenes, which as a beginner tend to get to you. And
as a pro you get to the point where it doesn't affect your spirit. But
that day I was facing a man groomed by a family dynasty, I basically
had to make myself with the help of many who were just as green in
this business as I was. So long ago.


6. How long have you been studying martial arts?

I'm coming up on 30 years study in martial arts.


7. How did you get into the UFC the first time you fought there? What
was the process?

UFC had not yet begun when I called for a rematch with Royce. Rorion
had told me of something he'd been working on for some time and it
sounded unbelievable. He said that because I had no formal title I
would have to go first as an alternate to gain entrance. I really
only wanted the rematch but the wheels were in motion.


8. You are responsible for creating a form of combat aikido. Can you tell
us about that, and which disciplines you incorporated into it?

Combat Aikido is a sportive rendition of Aikido, which emphasizes and
encourages scoring by virtue of the traditional techniques of Aikido
and in the spirit of Aikido that techniques should not be forced but
that your opponent is essentially duped and led in a direction rather
than forced by physical power alone to that conclusion. Any
technique can be considered Aikido if it is performed in this
spirit.


9. What have you been focusing on since your Cage Rage fight last year?

Since Cage Rage I've taken to consider the sport as it needs to be
changed. In as much as I won't change any venue, I will have my own
event. I resent the current wave of ignorance burlesquing the
fighters and the events, promoting a wide range of negativity to which
mainstream has been associated.


10. Which fight do you consider your best performance?

Based on the circumstances, my best performance will always be my next
one as I still will fight anyone. I don't believe in hype, there is
always a way to beat anyone.


11. Do you ever watch any UFC or Pride events now? If so, which fighters,
current day or past, do you enjoy watching?

The two top guys I love to watch are Chuck Lidell and Fedor
Emelianenko. It's like going to the martial arts museum of
science. There's loads of talent everywhere, but when entertaining
technical fighters are concerned those are my two favorites right
now. Of course the world is always changing. Now we have Gabriel
Gonzaga. Wow! God bless him. Guys like him will be the reason we
will go back to submission only on the mat. Enough is enough. We are
men not animals. No need to prove that point. If Dana White wants to
let it slide go back to no rules and I'll invite some eagle claw gung
fu experts to see men having their eyes scalloped and the skin
stripped from their heads via the eyelids and lips. Stop it! You
should aim it towards an Olympic event not a snuff film.


12. Who was your toughest opponent?

My toughest opponent. This question has an ever-changing answer
depending on my mood, but in terms of the toughest guy pound for pound
Chris Lytle is the toughest. Chris Lytle is as tough as any man there
is, but I wouldn't want to take away from the likes of Yuki Kondo, or
anyone for that matter who is of that ilk. I mean their guts. They're
all tough, but these are spiritually endowed and like so few fighters are
physically unenhanced. Chemically enhanced fighters get their courage
from a needle.


13. What are some of your other interests outside of martial arts?

Outside martial arts I'm a perpetual student. I love language study,
music study, piano, guitar, chess, and family. Religion as a means of
devotion to one God. And destruction of thinking which seeks to
portray religions as separate from each other and against one another.
My most important interest though is in the encouragement of universal
conscientious objectorship. That every military personnel should at
once form a non-cooperation movement and end the war based on lies.


14. When you were training for a big fight, what were some of your
routines?

One of my favorite routines was a brisk 4 mile run with an eight pound
mallet in each hand. Though it nearly killed me each time, the effects
on my power were amazing.


15. What exactly happened in your loss to Joe Slick at UFC 23? You had to
stop due to injury, what was the extent of the injury, and how long
were you out of action?

Joe Slick used ko soto gari for a takedown and my foot gripped the mat
much the way Cro Cop's did when he went down from Gonzaga. It acted
as a heel hook to my knee and devastated the joint including the
cartilage and tendons. Luckily no surgery but what a miserable time
of it.


16. Tell us about your school, how is it being the teacher, rather than
the student?

Teaching is learning, in fact I'm growing technically much better from
teaching.


17. When you fought for Frank Shamrock's ShootBox organization in 2003,
you won with a submission in the first round; How did you get the spot
on the card, and how long before had you decided to come back and
fight again?

Frank simply called me one day and said what are you doing? The shoot
box seemed novel, and as I remember it was an unusual thing though to
this day I've never seen the fight.


18. The first time you fought Masakatsu Funaki, you submitted him at the
1:01 mark, easily the quickest loss of his career. A certain Brazilian
Jiu-Jitsu legend, Rickson Gracie, took over twelve minutes to do the
same job. How does that make you feel?

Well the rules under which Rickson fought Funaki were much different
than in Pancrase at that time. To say it's a fair comparison, not
really. Had my fight with Funaki been NHB instead of the aesthetic
Funaki wanted things would have been different. He wanted to be as
Judo is, that anybody could play. Not everybody can NHB.


19. I asked earlier if there were any fighters that you enjoyed
watching. On the flip side of that, are there any guys that you think
are getting too much credit?

I'll say definitely there are fighters who don't get enough credit.
And there is a lot of sensationalizing, and deifying of people. I
also consider that in UFC 2 the medical that UFC wouldn't cover was
more than the $3000 I made, but Tito Ortiz gets $1,000,000 (???) for
talking trash doesn't seem fair somehow.


20. Will we see Jason DeLucia step into the ring or cage again anytime
soon?

There are only a couple of fights at this point I would really want.
The biggest for me would be of course Bas Rutten. In my career it
would be the only bad blood fight I've ever had, and it would be his
last.

Thanks for reading guys, hoped you enjoyed it.

Post #1   6/24/07 2:06:52PM   

richieb19

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Awsome!!!

I've spoken with him a few times via pm's at SD... hes a really cool guy.

Post #2   6/24/07 3:39:39PM   

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He really is. Hes a nice guy, but hes very gunshy about speaking in public due to his experiences with Sherdog and Bas. You were there then I think...

Post #3   6/24/07 3:52:35PM   

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Posted by rcg916

He really is. Hes a nice guy, but hes very gunshy about speaking in public due to his experiences with Sherdog and Bas. You were there then I think...

Yes I was, Bas and him haven't gotten along in a while, and it has to do with both of there ego's... When I spoke privately with Jason he really took the time to answer my questions and encourage me, he's a class act in my book.

Post #4   6/24/07 4:11:22PM   

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Posted by rcg916

He really is. Hes a nice guy, but hes very gunshy about speaking in public due to his experiences with Sherdog and Bas. You were there then I think...



Was the stuff with Bas calling him out for putting Voodoo on him our whatever. I rmember Bas posting a loooong thread about something like that

Post #5   6/24/07 4:11:49PM   

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Posted by Manfred


Posted by rcg916

He really is. Hes a nice guy, but hes very gunshy about speaking in public due to his experiences with Sherdog and Bas. You were there then I think...



Was the stuff with Bas calling him out for putting Voodoo on him our whatever. I rmember Bas posting a loooong thread about something like that



Lol, it originally started with the steroid accusations... but yes, there were talks of voodoo and poisoning... Different strokes I guess bro. lol.

Post #6   6/24/07 4:13:08PM   

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Posted by richieb19


Posted by rcg916

He really is. Hes a nice guy, but hes very gunshy about speaking in public due to his experiences with Sherdog and Bas. You were there then I think...

Yes I was, Bas and him haven't gotten along in a while, and it has to do with both of there ego's... When I spoke privately with Jason he really took the time to answer my questions and encourage me, he's a class act in my book.



I agree, he was sooooo thankful and legitimately gracious for me wanting to do an interview with him... In my head I was like, "dude, youre a legend. are you kidding?" Some may dispute the legend status, but its hard to disagree that he was in the mix at the beginning... And winning. UFC, Pancrase, all of those big Orgs. Not to mention he has over 50 official fights with 33 wins. Not too shabby.

Post #7   6/24/07 4:17:22PM   

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Posted by rcg916


Posted by Manfred


Posted by rcg916

He really is. Hes a nice guy, but hes very gunshy about speaking in public due to his experiences with Sherdog and Bas. You were there then I think...



Was the stuff with Bas calling him out for putting Voodoo on him our whatever. I rmember Bas posting a loooong thread about something like that



Lol, it originally started with the steroid accusations... but yes, there were talks of voodoo and poisoning... Different strokes I guess bro. lol.

It started long before the steroid accusations... This is old, and don't ask me for a source because I really can't remember, but it may have been Jason himself... Apperantly Bas had promised a 4th match with Jason if ever he where to return, but when rumors started going around that Bas would come back, he mentioned nothing of it... and when asked if he would fight him again he responded with something like "Why would I want to fight him again", and just plain putting him down... I assume that theres bad blood from even longer before that lead to this... just thought I'd share...

Post #8   6/24/07 4:20:30PM   

rcg916

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yep. I can vouch for that... Jason though he should get the fight like Bas "promised"... thats when the claws came out, lol.

Post #9   6/24/07 4:31:11PM