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Leonard Garcia says Girl St. Pierre is scared of heights (Video)

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Budgellism

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"The first time I met Georges, we went on a run in the mountains and Georges is afraid of heights. Nobody knows this, but he's like a girl when it comes to heights. Part of the run takes us on the edge of the mountain where you can safely run but right off the edge is a drop. He's behind me running and he's calling my name and he was like 'Hey man, can I grab the back of your shirt while we run?' I was like, 'What, why?' He was trying to tell me, 'The height!' It's a funny story, he was holding on to the back of my shirt while we were running and he's like, "Don't tell nobody about this,' and here I am doing an interview about it."

- Leonard Garcia

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Looks like GSP and I have something in common.

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Post #1   12/21/11 6:40:08PM   

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Post #2   12/21/11 6:53:16PM   

KungFuMaster

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You're not the only one. I am terrified of heights. I cannot even stare down from a cliff side. I just have this fear that I may freeze and involuntarily plunge to my death.

I go camping a lot and the best spots are always up in the mountains by two reservoirs which of course have dams. To get to the ideal spots, you have to drive alongside the dam of either reservoir. Every time I have to do it, I would literally have a mental breakdown while talking to myself out-loud, "Keep the steering wheel straight. Keep the steering wheel straight."....and I would continue to say this while crawling at 10 mph until the stretch is over.

Here is a picture of the Dam I am talking about.

stretch
The picture doesn't do its justice but it's the only picture I could find. You literally drive alongside the cliff with no rails and from inside the car, it is a very steep drop and not anything like the picture.

Last edited 12/21/11 7:19PM server time by KungFuMaster
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Post #3   12/21/11 7:16:42PM   

Twenty20Dollars

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Holding onto Garcia's shirt isn't going to save him from falling off, it's only going to drag Garcia down and kill them both.

I have a fear of heights as well.

Post #4   12/22/11 12:26:10AM   

bojangalz

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Posted by Twenty20Dollars

Holding onto Garcia's shirt isn't going to save him from falling off, it's only going to drag Garcia down and kill them both.




Doubtful. Pretty sure GSP knew full-well that Leonard would have no problem windmilling them to a safe landing miles away from the mountain.

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Post #5   12/22/11 2:29:35AM   

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Funny story.

"Acrophobia " like a lot of phobias, is irrational. I'm a bit afraid of heights, only when close to an edge or something. I know I'm not going fall, but damn it's scary anyways.

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Post #6   12/22/11 2:24:28PM   

Aether

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Posted by scoozna

Funny story.

"Acrophobia " like a lot of phobias, is irrational. I'm a bit afraid of heights, only when close to an edge or something. I know I'm not going fall, but damn it's scary anyways.



I'm pretty sure that all phobias are irrational fears. I'm fairly certain that it is actually a requirement. This is why there is no such thing as having a phobia of lions, for example. You're supposed to be scared of them, they'll f***ing eat you lol.

To be honest, most of the people who think they have "acrophobia" really don't. There's a certain amount of fear that is normal, and then there is "I break down, start crying and shit my pants when I walk up the stairs" type fear. The difference between them is if you have a normal fear of heights, you might get nervous or move extra cautiously, near the edge of a tall building, whereas an acrophobic person could possibly be scared to stand on a chair or climb a short ladder and have a full-blown panic attack.

There's some gray area in the middle of course, but generally a fear of heights is just a normal instinct for self-preservation. Only about 5% of people have Acrophobia, but probably nearly anyone you ask will tell you that they have it.

Last edited 12/22/11 2:49PM server time by Aether
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Post #7   12/22/11 2:49:00PM   

KungFuMaster

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Posted by Aether


Posted by scoozna

Funny story.

"Acrophobia " like a lot of phobias, is irrational. I'm a bit afraid of heights, only when close to an edge or something. I know I'm not going fall, but damn it's scary anyways.



I'm pretty sure that all phobias are irrational fears. I'm fairly certain that it is actually a requirement. This is why there is no such thing as having a phobia of lions, for example. You're supposed to be scared of them, they'll f***ing eat you lol.

To be honest, most of the people who think they have "acrophobia" really don't. There's a certain amount of fear that is normal, and then there is "I break down, start crying and shit my pants when I walk up the stairs" type fear. The difference between them is if you have a normal fear of heights, you might get nervous or move extra cautiously, near the edge of a tall building, whereas an acrophobic person could possibly be scared to stand on a chair or climb a short ladder and have a full-blown panic attack.

There's some gray area in the middle of course, but generally a fear of heights is just a normal instinct for self-preservation. Only about 5% of people have Acrophobia, but probably nearly anyone you ask will tell you that they have it.



You are correct. In my case, I can say I don't have a phobia but then again...there are levels of fear which will be different from person to person which is the gray area you are referencing. My fear has to do with safety. I am a safety precaution freak. Everything around my house is set up to avoid accidents and anytime safety precautions are compromised, I get nervous.

In my case, if there was a rail alongside the cliff side, I would be more at ease. (see my last post)

Post #8   12/22/11 9:15:30PM   

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Fears or phobias are not irrational. They are learned behaviors. Extreme phobias are usually associated with dramatic incidences such as neglect, abuse, torture, attack etc.

People are born with only two fears which are the fear of loud noises and the fear of falling. Every other fear a person may have is either learned and or induced.

Post #9   12/22/11 9:29:35PM   

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Posted by KungFuMaster

Fears or phobias are not irrational. They are learned behaviors. Extreme phobias are usually associated with dramatic incidences such as neglect, abuse, torture, attack etc.

People are born with only two fears which are the fear of loud noises and the fear of falling. Every other fear a person may have is either learned and or induced.




pho·bi·a [foh-bee-uh] noun
a persistent, irrational fear of a specific object, activity, or situation that leads to a compelling desire to avoid it.



By definition, phobias are irrational. There may be a reason why you develop a phobia, but this doesn't make the fear of that thing rational. Fear is a reaction to danger, if the thing you fear poses you no danger, fearing it is irrational.

I think anyone would agree that being terrified of the colour blue has to be considered irrational, no matter what traumatic event involving something blue might have happened in your childhood. It isn't rational to fear something that you logically know poses no threat to you.

Post #10   12/22/11 9:41:50PM   

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I was once afraid of heights, so I started jumping out of airplanes ....... 1st jump was the scariest thing I've ever done, but after that I couldn't get enough jumps in.
Jumping from above 10000 is a thrill for sure.

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Post #11   12/23/11 12:54:30AM   

KungFuMaster

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Posted by Aether


Posted by KungFuMaster

Fears or phobias are not irrational. They are learned behaviors. Extreme phobias are usually associated with dramatic incidences such as neglect, abuse, torture, attack etc.

People are born with only two fears which are the fear of loud noises and the fear of falling. Every other fear a person may have is either learned and or induced.




pho·bi·a [foh-bee-uh] noun
a persistent, irrational fear of a specific object, activity, or situation that leads to a compelling desire to avoid it.



By definition, phobias are irrational. There may be a reason why you develop a phobia, but this doesn't make the fear of that thing rational. Fear is a reaction to danger, if the thing you fear poses you no danger, fearing it is irrational.

I think anyone would agree that being terrified of the colour blue has to be considered irrational, no matter what traumatic event involving something blue might have happened in your childhood. It isn't rational to fear something that you logically know poses no threat to you.



You are only referring to the physical aspect of fear. Fears and more importantly phobias are the result of mental impairments and or adjustments which have led many individuals to sustain life long psychological injuries.

Back in the older days of psychological research, a psychologist performed a rather inhumane test on a boy. Keep in mind, humans are born with only two fears - the fear of loud noises and the fear of falling.

In this test, a boy was subjected to very loud and startling noises every time he picked up the bunny doll. As the test progressed, the boy eventually learned to associate the bunny with the loud startling noise. At the end of the test, the boy has learned to fear the bunny. Is fearing the bunny a rational behavior for the boy? Yes - how can he not be afraid of the bunny? Every time he touches it, he is startled by a loud noise. His behavior and or fear is justified and reasonable.

What does it mean to be rational and irrational? Rational means having the quality of reason and can be justified and or explained. Irrational means not having the quality of reason and cannot be justified and or explained. Most fears or phobias can be explained and or justified. The phobias which we cannot explain are - either a mystery to current science or the funding for those particular fears are limited. In the case of the little boy, his fear of bunny dolls is reasonable, justifiable, and or explainable.

Post #12   12/23/11 1:53:33AM   

Aether

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ok first off this:


Keep in mind, humans are born with only two fears - the fear of loud noises and the fear of falling.


Is an assertion that you've made, and it is not correct. ALL fears are learned. Humans are born with reflexes, not fears. The baby can't fear the noise before it has heard the noise, it reacts after the fact and then learns to associate the unpleasant reflexive reaction with a fear of loud noises. Fear is anticipatory, reflexes are reactionary. If you hold a balloon and a pin in front of a baby that has never heard a balloon pop, it will not anticipate the noise. It will react upon hearing the noise, dislike the reaction, and learn to fear loud noises as a result of the reflexive response that they cannot control.

Same with the "fear of falling" this again, is a reflex. Infants do not have a fear of falling until they've fallen and learned that it has the potential to cause pain. This is the learned fear. They have a reflex called the Moro reflex which kicks in once the sensation of falling begins. There is no anticipation, it's reactionary.

No one is born with any fears, they are born with a set of basic reflexes, which occur without conscious effort. Some of these reflexes then become attached to learned fears. ie: you fall when you're learning to walk as a baby, the reflex kicks in as you're falling, you hit the ground and realize that it hurts, now you associate the danger of falling with the unconscious reflex of putting your arms out to stop yourself, they seem inextricably linked, but they are, in fact, separate processes which you have been conditioned to associate with one another. Exactly the same as the balloon example.

Second:


In this test, a boy was subjected to very loud and startling noises every time he picked up the bunny doll. As the test progressed, the boy eventually learned to associate the bunny with the loud startling noise. At the end of the test, the boy has learned to fear the bunny. Is fearing the bunny a rational behavior for the boy? Yes - how can he not be afraid of the bunny? Every time he touches it, he is startled by a loud noise. His behavior and or fear is justified and reasonable.


This is not an example of a phobia, so the argument is invalid.

noun
a persistent, irrational fear of a specific object, activity, or situation that leads to a compelling desire to avoid it.

Persistent is the key word that invalidates your example. The test does not in any way measure the persistence of this fear. A child with no capacity for reason may fear the rabbit for a short time, but as soon as the test is over and he begins interacting normally with his surroundings again, this conditioning will more than likely be reversed as the child sees other children interacting with stuffed animals, as he himself interacts with them, or as the child gains the capacity to reason that a stuffed animal cannot harm him.

If the child matures, gains the capacity for reason, and his fear of stuffed animals persists despite overwhelming evidence that they are harmless, his fear is illogical regardless of what conditioning he may have received as a child, because he now knows, logically, that the bunny can't hurt him. His conditioned fear response is now a phobia, it was not a phobia as soon as he stopped picking up the toy because he realized it was associated with loud noises.

Third:

noun
a persistent, irrational fear of a specific object, activity, or situation that leads to a compelling desire to avoid it.

Read the definition of the word, then try to present the argument that a phobia is not irrational. BY DEFINITION a phobia is an irrational fear. If the fear is not irrational, it is, by definition, not a phobia.

This point shouldn't even be up for discussion. You don't get to make up your own definitions for words. This is why certain words mean certain things, so that we have a common base off of which to build a discussion. If you think the word phobia means something that it does not mean, the discussion has failed before it has even started, because we're literally not even speaking the same language. This is the entire purpose of language and dictionaries, so we are all using words the same way.

This is not subjective. You're objectively wrong, since the basis of your argument is that a phobia is not irrational, which, by definition, it is. That's what the word means. It's like saying "apples are not a fruit!" or "That blue car is not blue!" You're contradicting yourself because the very definition of the word you're using is opposite to the meaning you're attributing to it. As a result, every single conclusion drawn from that base statement and any example you give to support it is automatically incorrect, since they have been derived from a false premise.

A conversation is not possible if 2 people use the same words and assign those words different meanings. You may pronounce and spell the word in the same way, but if our definitions are different, we are fundamentally speaking different languages.

Your logic is flawed on a number of different levels, from the definitions of the words you're using to the associations you're drawing with those words.

Post #13   12/23/11 3:57:16AM   

KungFuMaster

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Studies have been done to come to the conclusion humans are born with only two fears - the fear of falling and the fear of loud noises. These are innate and instinctive fears and they are neither learned or induced. An infant will have to learn to fear monsters but the fear of loud noises and falling are instinctively set in stone once the infant is born. The infant will either learn to condition itself to overcome, minimize, ignore, or magnify those fears but it will always be present. An adrenaline junkie will be startled from the sudden loss of balance. A person will be startled by the sudden and unexpected bang of a loud sound.

As far as our discussion goes, you have not presented anything which is your own. You based your entire argument on a given definition of a word. My argument is very relevant to the discussion. I know what the definition of a phobia states. I also know the majority of people have been conditioned to believe and accept that which is taught to them.

Emile Durkheim was a world renown psychologist, sociologist, and criminologist. He was the first to propose crime is normal. Prior to Durkheim, the popular believe was crime is not normal. In today's criminology, it is the overall consensus crime is a normal function of society. Durkheim challenged the current thought because he is not bound by what was given or taught to him.

Newton's laws which are based on the physics of gravity have been taught as laws. Guess what??? His laws are inaccurate. Einstein proved Newton's laws were inaccurate with solid mathematical and physical prove.

If we accept the current thought, our world will never improve. It is our human nature to question and challenge what is given to us and ultimately seek the truth. In our discussion, you are not seeking the truth - whatever the truth may be. It could be that you are correct and I am wrong but you are simply accepting and not seeking the truth yourself.

If you must know, I truly believe the term 'Phobia' should be deleted from the scientific vocabulary. It is misleading, inaccurate, and improperly coined. We have levels of fear. In your current thought, you probably accept levels 0 - 8 as fears and anything greater to be phobias. I, on the other hand, see them all as fears but with different levels of severity. Once you coin a term like 'phobia', you separate it from the rest of the other levels. Are we to say levels 7.9 and below do not affect our daily lives and that only levels 8 and above do? That is absurd.

And btw, I love how you threw in subtle insults in your post. Nicely done. I will not hold that against you.

Post #14   12/23/11 3:27:02PM   

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Wow. I think I pretty definitively smashed all of your arguments to pieces in the last post, and you're just repeating yourself and trying to compare theoretical physics to the basic concept that words have specific definitions.

Look up anything that I said in an independent publication, it's accurate, you're wrong.

TROLOLOLO

Last edited 12/23/11 3:59PM server time by Aether
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Post #15   12/23/11 3:51:41PM   
 
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