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Training doesnt matter?

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MethodMan

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Fans of any nationality can come to greatly appreciate the ground game especially if they are serious fans as opposed to casual spectators, there is also a high level of respect for fighters and those that sacrifice and train hard to be the best in Japan, while the same dedication is sometimes scoft at in the west.

Post #16   4/16/07 4:57:58AM   

garrick

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You all make good points. Some people may be given a gift to fight, others have to train their butt of to win in a match. But even if your natural gifted, I think theirs still the question of good conditioning.

Post #17   4/16/07 12:38:05PM   

hook_tothe_body

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I haven't started any training yet but I plan to. Kickboxing/JJ.

I watch MMA now and I can appericiate the little things the fighters do like fighting for position, set-ups for submissions and takedowns, faking a punch making someone commit to something and then shooting in, or fake going low for a shot then come in with a strike, or working the body so your opponents hands drop just a little bit when you go to throw a punch then you hit up high or vice versa, or kicking to get your opponent worried about that then work the hands a little bit, things like that.

It makes me mad when people boo a fight that is on the ground just because they don't understand what is going on.

I know that once I actually start training and learning that I'll have even more of an understanding and therefore appericiation for fighting.

Last edited 4/17/07 8:18PM server time by hook_tothe_body
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Post #18   4/17/07 8:15:30PM   

shinobi

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Posted by Jeffanori-Gomi

So Im in the mma lounge forum and getting into a minor dispute with one of the other posters. My argument is that training MMA, boxing, Muay thai etc helps shapes ones perspective on watching MMA events.

I was then told that training doesnt really matter, and got a story about street fights and how just being tough is enough to compete.

Does anyone else see the fallacy in this? If training didnt matter then Tank Abbott would be the UFC HW champ?

Maybe it is just me but if Im watching say a football game, (a sport ive never played) with some college football players, wouldnt they have insight to areas you would only know IF you played the sport?

Im not trying to alienate any fans here, but the people on this forum who train, don't you guys notice when your talking to people who just watch MMA events have quite a small perspective on the sport?

your thoughts



depends. some street fighters are so good that they can wretsle, grapple, and box, my dad is an example, however he's old now, but in his prime, he'd be a good contender at 155. but that is the rare occasion, most i'd say no. training hard everyday is what makes 99.99% of champions. so yeah its mainly a fallacy.

Post #19   4/17/07 11:21:50PM   

Brownsfan222

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Its like that in any sport. Before I started track I watched a few meets and had no idea what the guys were doing. Now I can watch the relay hand offs and know whats going on and no why they run they way they do.

Post #20   5/7/07 6:44:51PM   

ordean

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Training helps to understand the fight game. You don't need to train to be a fan but it helps to really understand the fight and to predict winners.

Post #21   5/16/07 6:48:32PM   

MethodMan

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Like I already said, fighting helps you understand a match and perhaps predict a fighter once the match has started, if one fighter is showing signs of fatigue or injury. But for predicting fights here on MMA playground I think a serious fan who has watched fortage of both fighters should be able to predict as well as a fighter or perhaps better if the fighter gets hit in the head a lot (Like me)

Post #22   5/21/07 9:58:36AM   

The-Don

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( to help revive a dead thread.,... )

I have to say without training your not going to make it... Sure you may have some success like Tank, but lets be realistic.. in the early days when he had most of his success most of the guys were one style fighters and mostly stand up. so these guys would stand and bang with abbott and while he may not have been much for kicks he could take a hit and deliver a nasty one himself.. but with the success of guys like Royce Gracie... people realized that punching and kicking as not all and as people cross trained and truly started to mix thier styles as early MMA was a mixtures of fighters from different styles not what it is today which is fighters with mixed skill... ( did not realize that I bet most of you younger guys) People whith just basic brawling skills fell the the way side hence Tanks lack of recent success no matter how hard he tries...

Post #23   5/15/08 12:17:07PM   

Rush

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No offence, but wasn't the thread about being able to appreciate watching an MMA event more if you had training experience?

Post #24   5/15/08 12:51:40PM   

fullerene

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To me the thing that is most often missed by people who have not at least done live sparring in a combat sport is a realistic concept of what makes a good wrestling/boxing/MMA "athlete". There is a general impression that the world is filled with "natural athletes" who can perform at the highest level in any sport and it's just a matter of luck and money as to which one they choose to dominate. It's also believed that this can be measured in the typical NFL combine measures (40 time, vertical leap, bench press max) or, not having that handy, in looking at how "ripped" a guy is.

It's definitely an aid in any combat sport to have low fat vs. muscle and to have traditional speed and strength. But you'll also find that well-timed, straight punches beat faster looping punches and that a wrestler who benches 300 pounds will have the balance and angles to throw a bodybuilder who benches 400 around like a rag doll. It's that less visible athleticism which is missed by a lot of casual fans.

Post #25   5/15/08 8:54:32PM   

The-Don

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yea it was.. I lost my train of thought... but it was still a decent observation... as for topic... Yea I think those who have any martial arts training can appreicate whats happening in a fight more...

Post #26   5/16/08 12:35:15PM   

Tizzy

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Truely, anyone can compete at anytime BUT if you plan on being successful you have to train and you have to train hard. It is difficult when I watch MMA with buddies who have never trained and never competed in anything. They don't understand that, when you are watching a match, and there is one guy who is getting beat down it doesn't mean that he/ she isn't tough. It just means that one person is winning and one person is losing. That's all.

Toughness is something different than being a good fighter.

Oh, and I have been training for a long time and in my training time I was a bouncer for nightclubs for a good part of that time. I have seen countless times that being tough isn't enough to be successful in the ring. I have NEVER never seen where toughness beat out a trained mma fighter.

Post #27   11/21/08 9:13:39PM   
 
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