Two styles at once??

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Jackelope
2/4/07 10:26:23AM
Anybody in here ever taken up two separate styles at once? I've never attempted it as I've always been a fan of dedicating yourself wholly to learning one style at a time, but I find myself wondering now. There's a free Judo class at the college I'll be attending, and I was thinking of paying for my own BJJ lessons at the same time. I've never taken either style (Only ever taken stand up striking arts) so I'd guess it'd be best to keep on the straight and narrow with one style, but maybe I'm wrong?

Another question- In regards to take downs how does BJJ compare with Judo? Does BJJ mainly utilize the wrestling type shooting takedowns or does it teach a wide array of takedowns? Thanks for all you guys' knowledge
Tha1
2/4/07 3:32:51PM
Judo takedowns occur mostly form the clinch, tie ups, etc. BJJ takedowns are weak in comparrison, most jiu jitsu guys have had wrestling experience which is why you've probably seen them shoot for doubles and singles. As for the training, pick either Judo or BJJ for a good ground base, free doesn't always mean better. Go with whatever suits you, or pay for both at the same time. You'll get the benefits of better takedowns (judo) and a more submissioin skills (bjj). Check out Shinya Aoki, he's got good Judo+BJJ with some rubber guard recently added.
Shinya Aoki
bayonetxwork
2/4/07 5:51:54PM
Man, its a free class. Definitely take both if you can. The only way I'd turn it down is if I had to pay for both, but hey, looks like you have that taken care of. BTW, what college are you going to?

Tha knows whats up about judo vs. bjj. Judo also has the advantage in clinching, because honestly not very many people in MMA practice it. It's a lot of throws, but also has ground aspects, and would fit very nicely with BJJ. Also you can just check out Karo Parisyan. Hes one of best judoka's in america.
theKirK
2/4/07 11:45:32PM
When I trained I learned, thai boxing, BJJ, wrestling, and boxing, consecatatively. I think its important in mma, when learning a new style to be able to utilize immediately in a full contact situation. ie: learning boxing while maintaining your sprawl abilities.
Jackelope
2/5/07 3:32:39AM
Thanks for the replies, guys.

The school is a community college in the Phoenix area. I'm not too sure about the instructor and all of that. It'd be a fun and easy way to earn college credits, though. Hopefully the instructor will be halfway decent and I can learn some good takedowns out of it, too. I have a wrestling background, but the judo throws really impress me when the guys do them right. I've watched both Shinya Aoki and Karo Parisyan and I'm constantly amazed. I do know that my grappling needs work, though.

Anybody know of good BJJ schools around the east valley in phoenix? (Mesa, Chandler, Gilbert, Tempe area)
waylon_o
2/5/07 5:03:23PM
At the moment, I'm taking judo for free at SEMO University and paying for a BJJ class across town...we do MMA in the BJJ class a few times a week, but it's BJJ-based. Judo helps me with my BJJ and vice-versa.
madmarck
2/7/07 7:09:20AM
Go to the Judo for sure if it is free. Judo take downs tend to be usefull against some BJJ fighters. They are hard to see coming. Just ask Diego.
Tha1
2/7/07 6:00:20PM
some sick judo highlights here
better yet some sick freestyle and greco highlights here. these are much more entertaining than watching a bjj watch imo. you could also join a local wrestling club, takedowns+ground control+great conditioning.
sambat
2/10/07 2:44:05PM
Ive never trained Judo. I trained in sambo for awhile but we didn't work on takedowns all that much. However, I train in Muay Thai now and the judo throws I do know are GREAT if you use the MT clinch. I use hip throws, uchimata, and the "russian hook" (i dont know the "real" term for the move, its like uchimata but you extend your leg past and hook it over). I would love to take a real judo class, especially for free!
DeadguY
2/12/07 8:47:52PM
Dave Camarillo the Head JJ instructor AKA created a style which incorporates Judo and Ju-Jitsu, he calls it Guerilla JuJitsu. Looks pretty tight and I wanna take it, but my work schedule prevents this from happening...dumb work....

Here's a link to his site and his thoughts on integrating the two arts, it's pretty long but it's a good read:

http://dcacademy.info/judo_jitsu.shtml

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ordean
2/26/07 11:42:24AM
I train Judo, BJJ, and MMA. Training two styles at once is fine if you are looking to become a well rounded fighter. Find what works in the MA and learn it well.

Judo and BJJ together make for a solid grappling game.
The-Don
6/18/08 7:26:29PM

Posted by DeadguY

Dave Camarillo the Head JJ instructor AKA created a style which incorporates Judo and Ju-Jitsu, he calls it Guerilla JuJitsu. Looks pretty tight and I wanna take it, but my work schedule prevents this from happening...dumb work....

Here's a link to his site and his thoughts on integrating the two arts, it's pretty long but it's a good read:

http://dcacademy.info/judo_jitsu.shtml




Actually I just picked up his book.. EXCELLENT INCREDIBLE are two words I use to describe it... I have taken both Judo and jujitsu and well the way he incorporates the two is nothing short of AMAZING

Between Judo and Jujitsu they have different strengths and weaknesses.. in Guerrilla style each is used to cover the others weakness i think it works great and in the book he even explains how alot of the moves can be used n No-Gi and MMA.... And the basics in the begining for rolling and falling.. remind me of day one Judo...
Rush
6/18/08 8:22:41PM
I was taking classical jujutsu, kenjutsu and ninjutsu all at the same time. They were all similar in some aspects so they complemented each other quite well. I did judo in between summers during my undergrad. Also, my aikido class actually has mandatory kenjutsu (sword) classes for senior students.

As a rule of thumb, as long as the basic movements are based off similar principles, they will complement each other (judo and BJJ will work well together). If the styles have different fundamentals (eg. weight distribution is completely different) you will have some problems.

This is why I think a lot of people starting out training in MMA have problems. Similar to people that do karate and jujutsu on the side.

That was the long answer, the short answer is this, you will end up having a better ground game in your judo class due to your BJJ training and have better stand up takedowns and clinch work in your BJJ class, because of your judo training.
Jackelope
6/18/08 10:52:57PM
Holy old thread revival. This thread was posted probably a year or so ago. Since then I've trained BJJ and Muay Thai at the same time, and now I'm training full on MMA, so pretty much all styles at once. I never took the judo classes simply because the schedule didn't work out and the Judo class got cancelled anyway.



The-Don
6/19/08 7:54:29PM

Posted by Rush

I was taking classical jujutsu, kenjutsu and ninjutsu all at the same time. They were all similar in some aspects so they complemented each other quite well. I did judo in between summers during my undergrad. Also, my aikido class actually has mandatory kenjutsu (sword) classes for senior students.

As a rule of thumb, as long as the basic movements are based off similar principles, they will complement each other (judo and BJJ will work well together). If the styles have different fundamentals (eg. weight distribution is completely different) you will have some problems.

This is why I think a lot of people starting out training in MMA have problems. Similar to people that do karate and jujutsu on the side.

That was the long answer, the short answer is this, you will end up having a better ground game in your judo class due to your BJJ training and have better stand up takedowns and clinch work in your BJJ class, because of your judo training.



I used to train in Ninjitsu as well.. I was also learning some Muay Thai and Jujitsu and Capoeria at the same time.. ( I sucked at the latter... )
Rush
6/19/08 8:45:58PM
What style of ninjutsu did you do?

I always wanted to learn Capoeira, but never had the time to try it.
Jackelope
6/19/08 10:09:03PM
What is the draw to Capoiera? I have never understood it. There's very few applicable things in it if you ask me. Momentum being one, and head movement being two. I really don't see any other benefits to that style and why people are so drawn to it.

Obviously it looks cool, but so does getting kicked in the head by a legitimate fighter when you're down on the floor pretend fighting but actually break dancing
Rush
6/19/08 10:19:27PM

Posted by Jackelope

What is the draw to Capoiera?




I think it looks beautiful and I can't dance anyways. So I figured I could kill two birds with one stone.
Jackelope
6/19/08 11:25:04PM

Posted by Rush


Posted by Jackelope

What is the draw to Capoiera?




I think it looks beautiful and I can't dance anyways. So I figured I could kill two birds with one stone.



Fair enough. In retrospect I didn't mean for my post to sound so angry at the style. I just don't understand the martial aspect of the art. Artistically I agree- it is beautiful. Not to mention athletic as hell. I can't dance, either.. haha
Rush
6/19/08 11:41:11PM

Posted by Jackelope

Fair enough. In retrospect I didn't mean for my post to sound so angry at the style. I just don't understand the martial aspect of the art. Artistically I agree- it is beautiful. Not to mention athletic as hell. I can't dance, either.. haha



No offence taken. It was a valid question. I forgot to mention it is athletic too. Man, the guys that do it are built. I guess all the handstands do that to you.
jiujitsufreak74
6/20/08 1:29:53PM

Posted by Jackelope

What is the draw to Capoiera?



i think this will answer your question

Capoeira in MMA
The-Don
6/20/08 1:35:39PM
Well Capoeria has its advantages in Balance, awareness, timing, speed, flexibility, Athleticisim... all attributes that help a fighter... I discovered very early I was not good at this art... but because of many of the moves being very circiluar the style has a fatal flaw.. if you get inside on someone and break thier momentum you pretty much have them stuck... Also from what I was told in many parts of Brazail You either study Jujitsu or Capoeria... its almost considered sacralige to learn both.... or so I have been told...

As for the ninjitsu./.. Man I honestly do not recall the style.. it's been about 13 years since I was in that class... I still recall alot though great instructor... If I can find out I will let you know...
Jackelope
6/21/08 3:30:39AM

Posted by jiujitsufreak74


Posted by Jackelope

What is the draw to Capoiera?



i think this will answer your question

Capoeira in MMA



For every one of those there's two of these stories-

Riposte

Anyway, it's all fine and dandy. Not everyone studies a style because they want to compete in MMA or kickboxing or anything like that.

From a fighter's standpoint I just mainly look down on the lack of economy of motion, protection of the KO areas, and the lack of a stable base. (i.e. the part in my video where the dude gets sidekicked about 3 feet to the side)

If anybody wants to make an argument on how effective capoiera is for MMA then I think we can squash that argument by looking for top flight MMA competition who's main style is capoiera.
The-Don
6/21/08 7:13:11PM
On a whole Capoeria I do not think would be effective in MMA Though mixing in some moves like the clip Cornish posted as you saw could have thier uses.. but I do not think you'd get away with stuff like that often...
bigbubbano23
6/23/08 12:57:01AM
i recently started taking judo classes and all i can really say is it is crazy. definatly alot to learn. all throws are extremly usful and work well against bjj guys, who focus on what to do when your on the ground and not really how to get there. I'd say my class is 75% standing takedowns and 25% ground work. I really like to go on the ground but in judo it's not always fun getting there. in my opinion judo is very underestimated in the mma world. if i could make the perfect fighter he would be great at Muay thai, judo, gracie bjj, boxing and have experince in wrestling.
The-Don
6/23/08 11:39:56AM

Posted by bigbubbano23

i recently started taking judo classes and all i can really say is it is crazy. definatly alot to learn. all throws are extremly usful and work well against bjj guys, who focus on what to do when your on the ground and not really how to get there. I'd say my class is 75% standing takedowns and 25% ground work. I really like to go on the ground but in judo it's not always fun getting there. in my opinion judo is very underestimated in the mma world. if i could make the perfect fighter he would be great at Muay thai, judo, gracie bjj, boxing and have experince in wrestling.



For awhile it was.. but as of late your seeing more judo style throws, in fact Guerrilla Jujitsu is a ground style that was developed by a Judoka who later learned Jujitsu and married the two styles in a way which seems to me very harmonious.
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