Supplement: PowerFULL

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The-Don
6/9/08 5:46:46PM
I saw an add for this and the write seems well too good to be true.. you all know the add Best ever.. It supposedly helps the body increase its Natural HGH levels... For you science-y people.. Is this stuff worth taking... 2nd.. Is it legal for competition.. or would a supplement like this fail you a drug test???? thats the important one.. espicvally for a fighter.... Her eis the web site...

www.USPLabsDirect.com

Any word good or bad on this supplement would be welcome.. My main interest is having bad knees I wonder if increased HGH levels would help my knees feel better..
Rush
6/9/08 6:04:57PM
While I am looking things up, what exactly is wrong with your knees. Keep in mind that many times knee problems are not problems with your knees at all.

Rush
6/9/08 7:18:37PM
OK here are some things that don't make sense to me.

1) They state at least three studies that were conducted (as marked by *, ** and ***), yet I cannot find the actual reference for these studies on that page.

2) In a couple of the studies, the state some increases of HGH levels

*average increase of HGH was 12 mg/ml (=12,000 ng/ml), which they equated to 5 IU of synthetic HGH
They also quoted the same study showed an increase of 40 ng/ml, which they equated to 15 IU of synthetic HGH

So this alone rings alarm bells. First of all their interconversion of between concentration and IU doesn't make sense. Second, even if they did make a mistake and 12 mg/ml is supposed to be 12ng/ml, this actually falls within the 3-35 ng/ml range for natural HGH production in the body (as quoted from wikipedia, which I didn't bother confirming with the original reference)

Another statement: In a completely different study performed by Greenspan**, one ingredient in PowerFULLâ„¢ was shown to increase HGH production by an incredible 221%!

So first of all, the don't indicate how that result was obtained. 221% is like saying that HGH levels doubled. Well, considering that levels can range between 3-35 ng/ml, 2 fold seems small considering that natural levels can vary by 10-fold.

Another statement 100% faster, proved to be 110% higher and lasted 165% longer!** again is making small changes (possibly statistically insignificant) look big.

All in all I am not sold on the actual product based on their failure to produce the actual references for the study and their inconsistencies in their "data presentation"

As to your question on whether this would violate rules, well, I don't know the rules governing HGH. I assume that certain levels are allowed up to a point. If this product works as it suggests, your HGH levels will increase just as they would if you were injecting HGH. So they claim you cannot be sent to jail or burned for using this product. The only way I see that being possible is that either it doesn't work or the fact that the levels of HGH they are quoting from those studies are within the natural range.


The-Don
6/10/08 2:03:20PM

Posted by Rush

While I am looking things up, what exactly is wrong with your knees. Keep in mind that many times knee problems are not problems with your knees at all.




The other information was helpful.. vasicly the increase would actualy be minor and in many cases it seems still with in the norm...


As for whats wrong with my knees I iwll be honest I am not 100.. It is mainly my left knee.. I hurt it way back in 95 when I was in bootcamp for the Navymost days I am perfectly fine and nothing seems wrong then on occasion like the last week or two until 2 days ago... it hurts .. the pain is pretty sharp and increases when I use my knee with preassue.. Standing sitting going up steps.. the pain is located on the sides behind the patella.. TO be honest I have not had it looked at since I got out of the navy so I really do not know what the exact damge is... I am getting ready to set a doctors appointment and have them look at it see if I can not find out whats wrong.. I am just praying I do not need surgery.. my insurance is not the best so I could not afford some of this better surgiries... I had a friend who was a gret hockey player had knee surgery.. and well now he can't play at all.. ... I want to still be able to compete, and train.. I have noticed then when I am in the gym for a few weeks the pain is all but gone and I feel great in fact I went about 2 years with no pain at all but since moving to TN I have kinda been out of the gym.. and now the pain is coming back... ( I am already exercising again and planning on getting back in the gym.. )
Rush
6/10/08 7:16:51PM
Well, if you hadn't told me that you injured you knee, I would say that it could be IT band syndrome. However, just because you injured it doens't mean it isn't IT band syndrome.

I've had my knees injured and the old injury has never been a factor for years, but I did get patellar tendinitis and IT band syndrome, which were caused by running in the wrong shoes and tight IT band respectively.

It's good that you are seeing the doctor. Make sure you have a lot of details about when it hurts. Also, make sure you ask a lot of questions. Don't push the fact that you had previously injured you knee unless you knee has been bothering you ever since the injury because they might be unrelated.

Knee surgery is sort of a last resort IMO. I think it is only a good idea to get it if you knees bother you on a day to day basis doing just normal everyday stuff. But then again, the doctor should know better than me.
Kracker_Jap
6/10/08 10:44:19PM
I really don't trust supplements unless they pass the test of time....

I give new products 3-4yrs before I try them..... it helps weed out the bad ones that don't work,fads and dangerous ones, like the old andro complexes
Styles
6/11/08 9:33:58AM
This place is in Naples, Fl. which is about 30 minutes away from me. I know that alot of fighters around this area do use products coming out of this place. Sorry I can be anymore help to you. Maybe talk to your trainer about this stuff. Maybe you want to look more into a supplement for joints and ligiments and a supplemnt for recovery assistance.
The-Don
6/11/08 11:47:40AM

Posted by Rush

Well, if you hadn't told me that you injured you knee, I would say that it could be IT band syndrome. However, just because you injured it doens't mean it isn't IT band syndrome.

I've had my knees injured and the old injury has never been a factor for years, but I did get patellar tendinitis and IT band syndrome, which were caused by running in the wrong shoes and tight IT band respectively.

It's good that you are seeing the doctor. Make sure you have a lot of details about when it hurts. Also, make sure you ask a lot of questions. Don't push the fact that you had previously injured you knee unless you knee has been bothering you ever since the injury because they might be unrelated.

Knee surgery is sort of a last resort IMO. I think it is only a good idea to get it if you knees bother you on a day to day basis doing just normal everyday stuff. But then again, the doctor should know better than me.



What is IT band syndrome??? Mainly I am not a runner.. never have been really... Someone mentioned I may need better inserts for my shoes as I mau not have the right support...
Rush
6/11/08 2:16:44PM
This is all copied from various sites because I am too tired to type right now.

IT band syndrome

Excessive friction between your Iliotibial Band and your knee (or hip) bone. This causes a sharp pain at either the side of your knee or the side of your hip. Usually caused by increasing your running or biking too fast and/or with bad form, but is also associated with weight-lifting (standing squats), court sports (raquetball, tennis, handball, etc) and even pregnancy.


How to diagnose ITB syndrome
As mentioned, a key aspect of ITB syndrome is lateral knee tenderness.

As often as not, the pain won't really hit home until the first one or two miles of a workout have been completed ('Iliotibial Band Friction Syndrome in Runners,' American Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 8, pp. 232-234, 1980). Once it starts, the pain tends to be persistent if you keep going - and frequently gets worse during downhill running (and while walking down steps). The discomfort may radiate up and down the leg, but - strangely enough - the pain will often almost disappear if you stop running and begin to walk slowly and with short steps.

If you have ITBS, a unique examination called the Noble compression test will often be 'positive'. As you lie on your back, your doctor will place his or her thumb over the lateral epicondyle of your troubled leg (the lateral epicondyle is the hard knob on the bottom, outside part of your thigh bone). With the thumb on your epicondyle, you will actively flex and extend your knee. If maximal pain occurs at about 30 degrees of knee flexion, watch out! You probably have ITB syndrome.

The reason your knee 'cries out' during this test is very simple: when your leg is straight, the ITB lies in front of the epicondyle; as you flex your knee the ITB actually passes over the lateral epicondylar surface. As you repeatedly flex and extend your knee (as you would during running), the ITB keeps moving back and forth against the epicondyle; if the ITB is inflamed and swollen, the friction associated with this epicondylar 'rub' can produce quite a bit of pain, especially when your doctor is forcing the ITB to be in close contact with the bone. Similarly, if you have ITB and you stand with all your weight on your affected leg and flex the knee to about 30 degrees or so, you will probably feel a lot of pain if you apply pressure to the outside of your knee.

(As an aside, walking 'stiff-legged' with the affected knee locked in place will often eliminate most of the pain, because it keeps the ITB from rubbing back and forth against the epicondyle.)

In truth, though, ITB problems don't always occur at the knee. Pain may also be present below the knee, where the ITB actually attaches to the tibia, and discomfort may also occur much higher up - in the tensor fascia lata itself or in its tendinous connection with the hip. Many runners recall an especially intense or prolonged workout just before their ITB troubles started. Often, ITB strikes near the beginning of the cross-country or track season, when athletes are attempting to step up their training loads. Having 'bow legs,' excessive leg-muscle tightness, a leg-length discrepancy, or very pronounced foot pronation can all increase the risk of ITBS.


Here are some sites with IT band stretches.

Link 1
Link 2
Link 3


Also, deep tissue massage helps release the IT band. Lay laterally with a rolling pin or pool noodle under IT band. Roll back and fourth to massage it. Try to relax in the process.

I had deep tissue massage that left huge bruises on my legs, but it helped release my IT band and my knee felt a lot better. Now I just maintain it with stretching.
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The-Don
6/12/08 3:00:12PM
remind me to come back and give yu props on this.. not sure if it is what I have but I am certinaly going to ask about it it sounds like a possible canidate
Rush
6/12/08 3:04:53PM

Posted by The-Don

remind me to come back and give yu props on this.. not sure if it is what I have but I am certinaly going to ask about it it sounds like a possible canidate




Don't worry about the props, I'll just send you the doctor's bill.
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