Former powerlifter starting MMA. Wondering..

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justsaygo
12/18/07 5:07:04PM
I was a competitive powerlifter for 5 years and now I have put that sport on hold to pursue MMA. I am wondering how my training (weightlifting wise) should or shouldnt change. I trained only for power speed and explosiveness. Low reps on the main core movements and higher reps on the accesory movements. I am also wondering if it is even safe to strength train on top of the Muay thai and ju jitsu training that im doing. Will I over train??

thanks guys
juanez13
12/18/07 8:23:28PM
you just have to balance you daily workouts where you will be able keep training at the same level, i would suggest not to do so much weight lifting and alot more cardio, to much muscle makes you slower , if you are trainign JJ you should doing workouts that will increase your flexibility....
Vendetta
12/19/07 12:57:41AM
How flexible are you? I'd say flexibility is the next step.
BluEyedDemon
12/19/07 3:07:46AM
I wouldn't lift on the same days that i train bjj or muay thai. I find that it puts a lot more strain on the joints lifting and doing bjj on the same day. If you must i would recommend less weight on those days that you do, something less strenuous.
Mastodon2
12/19/07 7:11:59AM
It's all part fo the speed / strength debate really. Being really strong will obviously help your wrestling, and your BJJ cause you could use it force holds on weaker opponents, but it won't help your striking that much. Good striking needs strength and speed, because as we (hopefully) all know, Strength + Speed = Power.

Striking is my game, so that's what I'll give my 2 cents on. Flexability is gonna be the main issue for you. Lifting huge weights, as should be obvious, shortens muscles and bulks them up, and affects the fast twitch / slow twitch fibre ratio.

Do lots of stretching to help ease your muscles back into it. Don't try stuff like high teep (front push) kicks etc without extensive warming up first or you are likely to tear your hamstrings or something annoying like that. Just do plenty of stretching throughout the day and you should be good, if you want to be a good striker though, I'd suggest that a lot of regular power lifting isnt the way to go. You need to be able to whip your limbs out really quick, and be able to retract them quick too if you want to be good at it. If you look at a guy like Jerome Le Banner, he is well muscled, obviously he is doing some weights, but he isnt over doing it, as you will see if you watch any of his stuff his speed is amazing for a 270lber. Then on the other hand, look at Bob Sapp, he may be like 375lbs in weight, and he has huge muscles, if he had the speed of Le Banner he'd hit like no one else, but he will never have that speed. He is simply too bulky and has too much of a weight lifting physique to ever be a good striker.
Rush
12/19/07 10:41:05AM

Posted by Mastodon2

Strength + Speed = Power.





Mastodon, I am ashamed. As a fellow scientist I would expect you to know that

Power = strength / speed

or

work / time




In all seriousness though, I agree about the striking. It doesn't take much power to knock someone out if you hit them in the right place.

All in all, I would work on technique, but I am more of a technical fighter.
905010
12/19/07 6:22:32PM
To increase flexablility try doing yoga. Its not all about having alot of muscle everywere, its more about getting muscle in the right places, set training/ bag work will help devolp that. It's all about having good technique. It is not all about size when it comes to power, look at all of the Thai guys, they have incredible power and very few are over 150 lbs. a good example of that is keokali (not sure if i spelt that right) but he is got crazy power and KO's HW's. You can look him up in the video section on this site.
justsaygo
12/19/07 6:29:27PM
Alright makes sense. Thanks for ur input guys
derekcalado
12/19/07 7:45:44PM
u should work on conditioning. no problem in having knock out power, if u cant go the distance, and overtraining might be a problem , u need days when u should just rest.
Rush
12/19/07 11:36:54PM

Posted by 905010

To increase flexablility try doing yoga..



I do Yoga and I must say that it is more about learning how to relax your muscle so you can move your body efficiently rather than pure flexibility. It is great for martial arts training.
fullerene
12/20/07 8:23:53AM
I'm not sure I agree with the tone of some of the responses. I did quite a bit of weightlfiting before and while training in mma and, more relevantly, I"ve trained a few guys who were compettive powerlifters (1500+ for the three lifts) as they began learning MMA.

The good news is that powerlifting is much more useful and much less harmful to combat sports training than traditional "get huge" bodybuilding training. The guys I worked with were no less flexible or slow than the average student--maybe a little better in those regards. As a matter of fact, I would suggest that guys who are serious about MMA incorporate some powerlifting into their routines to build strength and explosiveness--that's something you've got in the bank already.

The bad news is that, although strength is important in MMA, your strength won't be as useful--at least at first--as you might expect. Guys who seem much smaller than you with a strong wrestling base will seem to overpower you grappling on your feet and at least hold their own wrestling for position on the ground. Guys with skinny arms and snap to their punches and kicks will hurt you worse than you hurt them when you connect during sparring. Don't get frustrated by this...look at it as a validation of how far learning and practicing technique can get you. Think "if a guy benching 250 can move people like this, imagine what I'll do once I have the balance and angles he does." The areas that I saw powerllifting really helping was sub-defense. After a few months the guys I was training with were almost impossible to tap with traditional armbars and triangle chokes.
AchillesHeel
12/29/07 8:37:30PM
Do you have any other sports experience? Just wondering. I've never done power lifting myself, but I would guess that cardio is the biggest difference with any fighting sports. If you've played any organized football or rugby or anything like that, you'll at least have an idea of what kind of fitness you might need for MMA.


Posted by fullerene

The bad news is that, although strength is important in MMA, your strength won't be as useful--at least at first--as you might expect. Guys who seem much smaller than you with a strong wrestling base will seem to overpower you grappling on your feet and at least hold their own wrestling for position on the ground. Guys with skinny arms and snap to their punches and kicks will hurt you worse than you hurt them when you connect during sparring. Don't get frustrated by this...look at it as a validation of how far learning and practicing technique can get you. Think "if a guy benching 250 can move people like this, imagine what I'll do once I have the balance and angles he does." The areas that I saw powerllifting really helping was sub-defense. After a few months the guys I was training with were almost impossible to tap with traditional armbars and triangle chokes.


One guy I can think of who (sort of) illustrates this is Brad Imes. He wasn't a power-lifter, as far as I know, but he played Linebacker for University of Missouri, and I think played for a semi-pro team too. Anyway, point is, with a few years of MMA training, he's turned into a pretty good submission wrestler who is also football-player strong.
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