MMA training

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ricoj3323
10/28/07 1:11:08PM
hi I'm looking for someone or a good camp to help train me cause I want to compete in mma in 2-3 years i love this sport, it would be a dream of mine to compete. I'm very willing to learn and open minded and I live in Cheyenne, WY but I'm willing to relocate to the right situation. Will someone please consider this and help make my dream come true
fullerene
10/28/07 1:17:56PM
This isn't an invite, but I think anyone will want to know the answer to these questions (which hopefully you've asked yourself):
* How old are you?
* How much MMA training have you already done?
* How will you support yourself financially while you're training and fighting?
* What will you do if you fight and lose? Will your dreams still come true if you are a fighter but not a champion?
ricoj3323
10/28/07 1:36:22PM
well good questions i'm 20, I'll find some means of making money to support me finacially and I'm in boxing training right now and If I lose I lose I just come back more motivated and you have to crawl before u walk
fullerene
10/29/07 9:21:18AM
OK, that sounds reasonable. My suggestion would be to contact a camp rather than an individual coach. Coaching is important but so are sparring partners and a properly equipped gym. If you don't care about location, then you might as well try one of the top gym that are out there like Militech FIghting Systems, American Kickboxing Academy, American Top Team or Greg Jackson's camp. Or, if you have a particular fighter/trainer you really want to work with contact their camp.

When you sign up tell them (humbly) that you are planning on working out as much as possible and that you want them to let you know when they think you're ready for an amateur or pro fight. That should be all you need--the sooner you get in shape and learn the basics the sooner they'll give you the word. I would advise against going in and saying "I want to be a pro fighter" as your introduction--lots of people want to do that, they just don't want to do all of the shadow-boxing, pummeling, drilling, running, weight-cutting....that goes with it. Make sure you don't lump yourself in with those guys.
bayonetxwork
10/29/07 2:29:11PM

Posted by fullerene

OK, that sounds reasonable. My suggestion would be to contact a camp rather than an individual coach. Coaching is important but so are sparring partners and a properly equipped gym. If you don't care about location, then you might as well try one of the top gym that are out there like Militech FIghting Systems, American Kickboxing Academy, American Top Team or Greg Jackson's camp. Or, if you have a particular fighter/trainer you really want to work with contact their camp.

When you sign up tell them (humbly) that you are planning on working out as much as possible and that you want them to let you know when they think you're ready for an amateur or pro fight. That should be all you need--the sooner you get in shape and learn the basics the sooner they'll give you the word. I would advise against going in and saying "I want to be a pro fighter" as your introduction--lots of people want to do that, they just don't want to do all of the shadow-boxing, pummeling, drilling, running, weight-cutting....that goes with it. Make sure you don't lump yourself in with those guys.



Exactly. Don't go in there acting like your something your not yet, be humble, but be honest. Tell them about yourself, your 20 years old, eager to learn, competitive in nature etc. Only time will tell when you'll be ready, but you need to break the ice first before you can benefit the most out of training. Set smaller goals along the way. I'm sure if you go to any big martial arts center, they have invite classes for their "competition team." Set that as one of your priorities, I know a couple places that hold tryouts quarterly.

Basically work your ass off, get the basics, don't give them a hard time, and show them you're willing to learn.
Vendetta
10/30/07 1:40:27PM
Some good info in this thread. How much of a base in grappling and striking do you guys recommend having before starting to train with the goal of fighting MMA? I've been training jiu jitsu for a year and my personal goals are either seasoned blue belt or purple belt and some amateur boxing bouts before I seriously consider fighting. In other words, I don't kid myself, I know I'm years away still.
fullerene
10/30/07 6:08:21PM

Posted by Vendetta

Some good info in this thread. How much of a base in grappling and striking do you guys recommend having before starting to train with the goal of fighting MMA? I've been training jiu jitsu for a year and my personal goals are either seasoned blue belt or purple belt and some amateur boxing bouts before I seriously consider fighting. In other words, I don't kid myself, I know I'm years away still.


This is a pretty good gameplan. ALthough everyone's will be different, doing what Vendetta is doing is less of a career commitment up front but still puts him on the path to fighting professionally if he likes what he's doing and is good at it.

I'm not saying the threadstarter can't take a more agressive path, just pointing out the validity of this approach to other people who are reading this.
Vendetta
11/1/07 10:22:13PM

Posted by fullerene


Posted by Vendetta

Some good info in this thread. How much of a base in grappling and striking do you guys recommend having before starting to train with the goal of fighting MMA? I've been training jiu jitsu for a year and my personal goals are either seasoned blue belt or purple belt and some amateur boxing bouts before I seriously consider fighting. In other words, I don't kid myself, I know I'm years away still.


This is a pretty good gameplan. ALthough everyone's will be different, doing what Vendetta is doing is less of a career commitment up front but still puts him on the path to fighting professionally if he likes what he's doing and is good at it.

I'm not saying the threadstarter can't take a more agressive path, just pointing out the validity of this approach to other people who are reading this.



Cool.
MoN18kEy
11/5/07 9:28:55AM
How about Me i am 18 I have been wrestling olympic style wrestling for 6 years. and i wanna to jump into MMa. Is there any training camps in Orlando fl. I love the sport and i love to fight even if i am not a champion my dream will be fullfilled being a fighter alone. i wqas ust intrested in doing this and for my 19th birthday start training for the New Year
MoN18kEy
11/5/07 9:30:46AM
I want to do MMA as well what is ur suggestion for me I live in Orlando Fl, I am 18 i have wrestled for 6 years olympic wrestling. and i want to compete really badly i wanna start training for the new year and 8 days after i am going to turn 18. I was a regional champion 2 years in a row. Can you give me some suggestions
fullerene
11/5/07 11:15:11AM

Posted by MoN18kEy

I want to do MMA as well what is ur suggestion for me I live in Orlando Fl, I am 18 i have wrestled for 6 years olympic wrestling. and i want to compete really badly i wanna start training for the new year and 8 days after i am going to turn 18. I was a regional champion 2 years in a row. Can you give me some suggestions


I don't know the Orlando scene at all so you'll have to wait for someone else to give you specifics, but I do know that Florida has a large Brazilian population which should mean plenty of schools down there. I think ATT and Franca train around Ft Lauderdale and there are a lot of good boxers who pass through the Miami area.

But to start I think you could go to any decent school that teaches Brazilian Jiu Jitus (or no-gi sub grappling--there are a lot of names and spinoffs nowadays) and either a boxing or Muay Thai gym. If $$ is an issue (you said you're 18, right ) then you might check out judo and boxing at the local YMCA or rec center. Either way you have some technique to learn and, at least as importantly, you have to learn if you like getting subbed/subbing and getting hit/hitting people. It's different than wrestling and it's not for everyone (it's actually not for very many people at all). I would look for a school with an experienced instructor in those styles where you have a mixture of technique training and open sparring sessions (note: they may make you train for a while before letting you spar for the boxing/MT gyms). If you look up a few places on-line or in the phone book post some links or descriptions here and I'm sure people will give you some advice. If you like the training and are holding your own sparring/rolling try to get a few fights/tourneys locally as an amateur--MMA, boxing and/or grappling.

If that goes well and you're picking up the techniques and tempo quickly (like many wrestlers do) then I'd think about making some real life changes and that might mean moving closer to ATT or one of the big gyms out there. If you are training out of a place like that and beating most of the guys you spar with I think you're going to get pulled aside and asked if you'd like to get some fight experience.

One thing I'll point out because you come from a wrestling background which I assume was run through your school is that instructors/competition/tournaments are not as consistently organized in other combat sports. While you can usually trust your coach and trust the pedigree/records/rankings of other wrestlers it's tough to do that with any of the amateur martial arts--there are a lot of "International Grand World Champions" out there who don't know anything but how to talk big. Just like with wrestling, you make your life a lot easier in boxing/MT/BJJ if you learn techniques the correct way right from the start. If not, you'll start sparring and compensating for technique with speed, agression and strength which is only going to get you so far and is tough to unlearn. So if you're unsure about the instructor qualifications try to talk to someone who knows the scene out there or, if there isn't anybody, ask in these types of forums.
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