MMA is the MOST Physically Demanding Sport in the World

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JimmieDD
10/2/08 11:29:52AM
http://www.mmatraining.com/featured/mma-is-the-most-physically-demanding-sport-in-the-world/

What do you guys think of this?

You think MMA is the worst? I have heard water polo is ridiculous.

I would say MMA is one of the hardest to trian for for sure.

StorminYourman
10/2/08 11:39:55AM
I would say body building ranks up there with MMA in that every muscle in the body has the be strong lean trained and ripped. Weight cutting is just the same.Of course MMA has more physicality
The-Don
10/2/08 12:15:04PM
dude who wrote the article IMO is an MMA nuthugger... there are lots of sports that are just as physically demanding.. I used to play hockey nad was a golaie.. I played soccer.. if your standing around your not playing the game... these guys may not be running all out but are moving almost non stop for at least an hour.. (again I played goalie true I got to stand around a bit. ) Do not get me wrong.. MMA is hard but the training is no more or less then any top athlete in any sport.. look at a gymnyst.. the only difference is MMA training (along with boxing) requires you to get hit.. so yea it may require more physical punishment but it is not more physically demanding..
Darnok
10/2/08 12:41:28PM
For starters it was written by an MMA website, they probably had a slow blog month or something.

I think the thing to remember is at least now MMA is being accepted as a sport where the athletes have to train seriously and cant be bar brawlers (aka tank).
The_hungry_lumberjack
10/2/08 1:45:52PM
Not even close if you are talking only about endurance. The 4 deserts series of ultra marathons would be the most grueling endurance feat I can think of (providing that you actually try to win each race by running it). Each race is a 250km footrace (Records are under 25 hours that's 10km/h for 25 hours!) in the 4 greatest deserts on earth, the Sahara in Egypt, the Gobi in China, the Atacama in Chile and the ultimate test, the "Last Desert" in ANTARCTICA. In terms of strictly endurance, MMA doesn't even compare.

As an all around physical sport though, yes I would agree, MMA takes on average more skills, endurance, strength, timing, speed, co-ordination and strategy than any other sport on earth that I can think of. Nothing else I can think of requires such a large combination of skills and abilities. (and no football doesn't match up, after each 10 second play you have a 20 second rest, never mind halftime, quarter breaks, and you only play offense or defense so that cuts in in half. I played football and trained MMA. Way more tired after an average MMA workout than a hard football practice even with the full equipment, hockey too.)
BIGKAT
10/2/08 1:46:08PM
I would say american football is the most demanding and hardest to train for. You are wearing upwards of 35 pounds of equipment all day long in 100 degree weather, while inside the uniform your body temp is somewhere around 115- or more degrees. You have to do everything that MMA does and more to prepare for a game.

Anyone who has ever played "Head Coach" SUCESSFULLY will understand the demands that each player is placed under, regardless of position. You run in all that hot equipment, you workout with weights, you run drills, you are constantly being hit and hitting another player, you are constantly using every muscle in your body to push, pull, tackle, run, throw, jump, hit, juke etc. All while wearing a uniform AND helmet which keeps the heat inside and on your head.

Anyone who has ever worn a football uniform knows exactly what I am talking about. I have never seen a bonifide 400 pound MMA fighter that could fight another 400lb MMA (lineman) for 2 hours and still be standing at the end of the game. Most MMA guys are lucky to last 25mins in the octagon without looking like they are about to fall over and puke. Ive never seen an MMA fighter regardless of size don 35lbs of equipment for 2 hours and get hit in every part of his body by MULTIPLE men who are running full speed and hitting with the intent of knocking his opponents head off. I've never seen an MMA player get paralyzed from a brutal hit yet Ive seen a few in Football. Broken bones are all part of the game in football, and player play with breaks, sprains, tears, etc etc whereas an MMA figter gets a sprained wrist and calls off the fight.

MMA fighters do train alot, and spend alot of time in the gym, but we are talking about how physically demanding the sport is, and until MMA fighters don 35lbs of equipment in 110 degrees (regardless of outside weather) then I would have to give the nod to famerican football players.

Football players do everything an MMA fighter does and more (BTW Ive heard where receivers and defensive back practice MMA grappling to help tackle better or avoid being tackled or having tha ball stripped.

anyway thats my personal opinion from having played football for 3 years, and having studied jiu jitsu for a little over 2 years.
HumanTarget
10/2/08 2:52:11PM
Football? Soccer?

Ive seen people who would seem very physically fit come in my gym. They gas FAST! Triathlon runners dont stand a chance. MMA is defenity the most demanding. Your taking punishment NON stop.
Manak
10/2/08 2:56:47PM

Posted by BIGKAT

I would say american football is the most demanding and hardest to train for. You are wearing upwards of 35 pounds of equipment all day long in 100 degree weather, while inside the uniform your body temp is somewhere around 115- or more degrees. You have to do everything that MMA does and more to prepare for a game.

Anyone who has ever played "Head Coach" SUCESSFULLY will understand the demands that each player is placed under, regardless of position. You run in all that hot equipment, you workout with weights, you run drills, you are constantly being hit and hitting another player, you are constantly using every muscle in your body to push, pull, tackle, run, throw, jump, hit, juke etc. All while wearing a uniform AND helmet which keeps the heat inside and on your head.

Anyone who has ever worn a football uniform knows exactly what I am talking about. I have never seen a bonifide 400 pound MMA fighter that could fight another 400lb MMA (lineman) for 2 hours and still be standing at the end of the game. Most MMA guys are lucky to last 25mins in the octagon without looking like they are about to fall over and puke. Ive never seen an MMA fighter regardless of size don 35lbs of equipment for 2 hours and get hit in every part of his body by MULTIPLE men who are running full speed and hitting with the intent of knocking his opponents head off. I've never seen an MMA player get paralyzed from a brutal hit yet Ive seen a few in Football. Broken bones are all part of the game in football, and player play with breaks, sprains, tears, etc etc whereas an MMA figter gets a sprained wrist and calls off the fight.

MMA fighters do train alot, and spend alot of time in the gym, but we are talking about how physically demanding the sport is, and until MMA fighters don 35lbs of equipment in 110 degrees (regardless of outside weather) then I would have to give the nod to famerican football players.

Football players do everything an MMA fighter does and more (BTW Ive heard where receivers and defensive back practice MMA grappling to help tackle better or avoid being tackled or having tha ball stripped.

anyway thats my personal opinion from having played football for 3 years, and having studied jiu jitsu for a little over 2 years.



Rugby dominates football
to much rest in football along with pads while rugby is the same thing but without pads and no rest seeing as it 2 40 min periods of continuous play. every sport offer unique ways of training the body so topic tends to go in circles
Manak
10/2/08 2:57:44PM
i think it does come down to mma n rugby though
Pookie
10/2/08 3:11:57PM
Soccer players go hard for 90 minutes in 11 different position.
wapttn
10/2/08 4:14:36PM
I'm the type of athelete who plays all sports.. most of which i've played varsity.

Soccer: Unless you're a midfield, all you need is decent cardio because you're doing a lot of jogging or walking. If you are midfield, then ya you need some serious cardio to be able to play at a professional level... but cardio and fast twitch muscle is all you need.

Football: This is a fall sport. How often does an NFL team play in 100 degree weather? And could you find me a medical reference of a player's core temperature of being 115? As mentioned in the above post... plays are short, the breaks inbetween allow players to get their rest. If thats not enough you get a rest period on every call, if thats not enough you get timeouts, if thats not enough you get breaks at the quarter, if thats not enough you get a rest at halftime, if thats not enough you get subs, and if thats not enough, a balanced game will have you on the field around 40% of the time. Do football players train hard and are in peak physical condition? you're damn right they are... but dont get into things like taking hits and having to wear gear because hockey makes a far better argument.

Rugby: Never played... always wanted to. From watching, its nonstop, and its physical... but apart from the occasional bursts of speed, i find that the pace is not as quick as other sports. I've seen a lot of people who are not in great shape play rugby well at a varsity level. But i've never played so i cant comment too much on this.

MMA: I've said for a few years now that mma athletes are the best conditioned athletes in the world. World class body builders will have better muscularture, world class marathon runners will have better cardio, world class running backs will have better agility, and world class boxers will have better hand eye cordination but in what sport are you useless when you're not in the top 1 percentile of all of these categories? and thats not mentioning skill or talent... with football a player's job is so specialized that your kicker doesnt even punt.. in a marathon... all you gotta do is run. With mma you're need to be highly specialized in more than one discipline to even compete... if you wanna be a champion you need to dominate all aspects.


No sport requires such a high level of cordination, cardio, intelligence, agility, strategy, strength, power, speed, flexibility, explosiveness, ability to sustain damage, and focus... not to mention the requirement of such a diverse but highly developed skill set
Ben_Hutch
10/2/08 4:25:03PM
In terms of how Demanding/physically difficult they are, Rugby ***** all over Football (NFL) all day long, there's no way anyone can say otherwise.

And that's coming from a big NFL fan.
Rush
10/2/08 5:04:45PM
Oh God not this again.
BIGKAT
10/2/08 5:14:58PM

Posted by wapttn

I'm the type of athelete who plays all sports.. most of which i've played varsity.

Soccer: Unless you're a midfield, all you need is decent cardio because you're doing a lot of jogging or walking. If you are midfield, then ya you need some serious cardio to be able to play at a professional level... but cardio and fast twitch muscle is all you need.

Football: This is a fall sport. How often does an NFL team play in 100 degree weather? And could you find me a medical reference of a player's core temperature of being 115? As mentioned in the above post... plays are short, the breaks inbetween allow players to get their rest. If thats not enough you get a rest period on every call, if thats not enough you get timeouts, if thats not enough you get breaks at the quarter, if thats not enough you get a rest at halftime, if thats not enough you get subs, and if thats not enough, a balanced game will have you on the field around 40% of the time. Do football players train hard and are in peak physical condition? you're damn right they are... but dont get into things like taking hits and having to wear gear because hockey makes a far better argument.

Rugby: Never played... always wanted to. From watching, its nonstop, and its physical... but apart from the occasional bursts of speed, i find that the pace is not as quick as other sports. I've seen a lot of people who are not in great shape play rugby well at a varsity level. But i've never played so i cant comment too much on this.

MMA: I've said for a few years now that mma athletes are the best conditioned athletes in the world. World class body builders will have better muscularture, world class marathon runners will have better cardio, world class running backs will have better agility, and world class boxers will have better hand eye cordination but in what sport are you useless when you're not in the top 1 percentile of all of these categories? and thats not mentioning skill or talent... with football a player's job is so specialized that your kicker doesnt even punt.. in a marathon... all you gotta do is run. With mma you're need to be highly specialized in more than one discipline to even compete... if you wanna be a champion you need to dominate all aspects.


No sport requires such a high level of cordination, cardio, intelligence, agility, strategy, strength, power, speed, flexibility, explosiveness, ability to sustain damage, and focus... not to mention the requirement of such a diverse but highly developed skill set



How many hockey players have collapsed and died on the field from heat exhaustion from weasring their uniforms while on ice? How many mma fighters have died from practicing in 35 lbs of equipment? None.

http://www.rgp.ufl.edu/publications/explore/v10n3/story4.html

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=94034620

The heat issue inside a football uniform is highly known, and all it takes is a simple goolge search to educate yourself. Why do you think that they are looking for ways to cool the uniforms so that it is bearable. I didnt say they had to play in 100 degree weather, I said they are over 100 degrees REGARDLESS of weather. I said 115 degrees, and I was wrong on that number which was an estimate, but it is common knowledge that the players perform at over 100 degrees constantly, regardless of a little 2 minute break they get ona time out. MMA fighters get a break every 5 minutes regardless, and all they have to do is kick someone in the nads and they get 5 min break, MMA doesnt even compare to american football. And rugby, try it with 35lbs of pads AND a helmet on where your bodyheat cant escape, and then tell me rugby is harder...thats laughable.




Solidus
10/2/08 6:39:23PM
As a sign of how physically demanding MMA is, look at how many fights get called off or pushed back every month because someone is injured from training. These guys are pushing themselves to the max to be the best in all areas possible because one, you cant rely on a teammate who is more skilled in one area, and two you're not going to have a very fruitful career if you cant hang at the top level. It might not be the most physically demanding, but as the sport progresses fighters are required to squeeze more and more out of their performance. No way you can compare that to football or soccer.
EliasG
10/2/08 6:59:47PM
these arguments don't matter much...but......

I played soccer in college...hard...not that hard. You just run a lot.

PLayed water polo in high school....very very hard.

Wrestled--very very hard.

Train MMA--very very hard.

Overall, one of the hardest is mma or waterpolo. Waterpolo is no joke because there is a lot of hitting and scratching, grabbing, etc... but you are in water and you never rest. Training with a jug of water over your head doing laps in the pool is hard.

I still pick MMA/Wrestling and Waterpolo.

When it comes to ELITE athletes though--decathletes probably got us all beat. ;)
Shawn17
10/2/08 7:18:50PM
Rugby is harder than football. It hurts wirthout pads. It is nonstop in football you play one side of the ball and you get a 40 second break between every play. How is that hard? The only reason why people get heat exhuastion is because they are overweight and not hydrated. Name somebody that died from heat exhaustion while practicing or playing football that wasnt obease by the bmi scale. Oh wait you cant.
DvS
10/2/08 8:38:26PM
There are alot of sports out there that are far more physically demanding than MMA
mikevolz
10/2/08 9:23:58PM
depends on how you define demanding

aeriobically?

triatholons, Aussie rules football, (soccer... sort of kind of a mix), speedwalking

an-aerobically?

football, olympic lifting.

postman
10/2/08 10:26:33PM
This has been done before here is the link.

Old Thread
MALICE
10/2/08 11:17:02PM
I want to point one thing out. Many arguments in this thread are made only towards the actual games or performing of the sport in question. NFL players may get breaks during actual games, but that does not mean they train any less than a rugby or soccer player.


If that was the case, take a look at swimming. Michael Phelps for instance. One of his performances may last less than a minute. Just a Minute. No big deal. Now put a rugby, football, soccer player, or mma fighter through one of his training sessions, and I bet they will look like an out of shape chump. Why?

The training is the physically demanding part of sports.

My point is different sports require different skills. To compare an athlete of one sport to an athlete of another sport is a very difficult process, because their training is specific to the skills needed for their sport.

So to compare sports is just plain absurd.

To me an athlete is an athlete. Does an mma fighter work physically harder than a tennis player? Yes But put an mma fighter through a tennis player's training session and I bet they will be sore in the morning.

Once again I think I made my points a little confusing Oh well. It's there. Just might have to read it twice.
Igmatheo
10/3/08 12:17:32AM
Underwater Basket Weaving.

Bet you all feel stupid.
Aether
10/3/08 3:55:41AM

Posted by BIGKAT
...MMA fighters get a break every 5 minutes regardless, and all they have to do is kick someone in the nads and they get 5 min break, MMA doesnt even compare to american football.




Are you watching MMA or Roshambo?
Ben_Hutch
10/3/08 11:48:17AM

Posted by xxMALICExx

If that was the case, take a look at swimming. Michael Phelps for instance. One of his performances may last less than a minute. Just a Minute. No big deal. Now put a rugby, football, soccer player, or mma fighter through one of his training sessions, and I bet they will look like an out of shape chump.



But that's just not true at all.
Jackelope
10/3/08 12:20:19PM
Each sport deserves it's props. As for me I've never done a sport that requires as much from my body as full time MMA training does. I wrestled in HS and played football, too. Physically I'm not sure it takes the cake, although I would argue that it shares the top of the heap with other physically demanding sports. The core temperature argument for football is a good one, but most wrestlers will tell you all about locking the doors, setting out the puke buckets and then burning yourself out in a sweaty, non-airconditioned padded room. I train MMA in Phoenix and we don't use air conditioning for our MMA room, either. So I would argue our core temperature is easily as high as any football player besides back in school during hell week when it was already 115 degrees outside.

EliasG
10/4/08 10:51:35AM
Yeah it is a stupid argument but we wouldn't be men if we didn't have stupid arguments about sports!!! Where is the fun in no pointless arguments?!

I probably would still take Wrestling/MMA/waterpolo with MMA taking a slightly higher position based upon the punishment you take and have to recover from even in training.

Decathletes are probably the BEST overall athletes. Dude who won the gold medal this time was ridiculous. The guy was a legitimate sprinter, middle distance runner, could jump, throw, lift, everything. That's nuts.

But some of the new training in MMA is whole body training and focuses alot on core so MMA might be there too.
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