Milestone Speech

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KungFuMaster
5/25/11 12:54:52AM
I was very hesitant to give this speech but after long hours of contemplating, I decided I should not deny the forum.

When I was but a little grasshopper making my debut in other forums, I was spanked and molested just like any other Noob. I toughen up and carried on while honing my trash talking skills. Before long, I elevated my trash talk to a whole new level which I never knew existed. I took on all new comers and veterans alike as I did not discriminate against anyone. I went on a bashing spree. I handed out spankings on a daily basis and I even offered discounts on preemptive spanks.

TAKE A MILD SPANKING NOW OR TAKE IT TEN FOLDS LATER: YOUR CHOICE.

But soon I grew tired of the spanking. I needed to re-invent myself.

And so I began my quest to change my ways....to change my perspective....
I began experimenting with tolerance, humility, respect and humanity. As I opened one door, another door becomes available which ultimately led me here to Playground.com. Soon, a whole new world unfolded in front of me. As I explored this strange new world ….................and with each passing day, I gained more and more of what I never had …............and lost more and more of what I did have. This new world which I have uncovered has transformed me.................and mold me into the man I am today.

As I once was doing the spanking, I now become the spankee.


But that is not why I called you here today. I summoned you here to the call of duty. As it was my duty to bestow onto you the gift.................the gift of love, ….............the gift of respect..........the gift of honor..............the gift of tolerance.................and most importantly …..........the gift of humanity,........now it is your duty to cherish and to embrace ….that which is love, respect, honor, tolerance, and humanity.

As I now close my last door, …............you will now open your first door.

And when you are through opening all doors ….........and you have explored the new worlds these doors have to offer,

…..................you will someday respond to the call of duty...............and you will someday be like me..................................

.........and become........................................no longer the spanker …...........but the spankee.
scoozna
5/25/11 2:45:40PM
haha...just letting you know someone is reading your stuff. Not sure where it's going, but reading nonetheless.
KungFuMaster
5/25/11 4:31:55PM

Posted by scoozna

haha...just letting you know someone is reading your stuff. Not sure where it's going, but reading nonetheless.



You are my savior. I was not sure anyone was reading my stuff either.

The thread is meant to go nowhere but there is a message behind all of my threads.

Because you cared enough to post and let me know someone has read my material, I will award you a prop.
Pookie
5/25/11 4:36:57PM
So at what age did you start experimenting with Mushrooms?

KungFuMaster
5/25/11 4:41:14PM

Posted by Pookie

So at what age did you start experimenting with Mushrooms?




I would award you another prop if I could.

And no, I have never experimented with mushrooms.
Pookie
5/25/11 4:46:18PM

Posted by KungFuMaster


Posted by Pookie

So at what age did you start experimenting with Mushrooms?




I would award you another prop if I could.

And no, I have never experimented with mushrooms.



I don't condone such things, of course... but im sure you would find them to be an eye-opening experience. Not for everyone of course *cough cough*, i would never recommend such... But you, yeah. You'd enjoy them.
KungFuMaster
5/25/11 4:58:43PM

Posted by Pookie



I don't condone such things, of course... but im sure you would find them to be an eye-opening experience. Not for everyone of course *cough cough*, i would never recommend such... But you, yeah. You'd enjoy them.



Why would you say I would enjoy them? The only thing I have tried was marijuana and I had a first time bad experience with it. It literally paralyzed me for hours and I was actually scared.

My threads may indicate I may need help, but I assure you, I am sane. It is only my method which has not yet been accepted by the forum majority.

In due time, I am sure my insane method(s) will garner more support.
Pookie
5/25/11 5:21:45PM
Because you're abstract and you seem to synthesize more than you analyze. The synthesis of abstracted themes leads to sudden metaphorical realizations when you team that up with Shrooms and a positive environment.
KungFuMaster
5/25/11 5:47:14PM

Posted by Pookie

Because you're abstract and you seem to synthesize more than you analyze. The synthesis of abstracted themes leads to sudden metaphorical realizations when you team that up with Shrooms and a positive environment.



LOL I do tend to be abstract and metaphorical in my approach but I think I can continue doing so without the help of shrooms.
KungFuMaster
6/14/11 2:32:57AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pericles

Discussion is the method by which adults learn from one another. And as so conceived, it differs quite strikingly from that sort of learning in which an older person teaches a younger person.

Real discussion consists of two or more persons talking to one another, each asking questions, each answering, making remarks and counter-remarks. Such conversation is at its best when the parties to it tend to regard each other as equal. That is the heart of the difference between learning by discussion and learning by instruction. In adult learning by discussion, each party to the discussion is both a teacher and a learner. Just as in the political republic, each citizen is ruler and ruled in turn, so in the adult republic of learning, each adult is both teacher and taught.

With this background, let us consider the nature of adult conversation. And let's consider the rules which should govern it if such conversation is to develop into good, profitable discussion, profitable as a means of learning.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pericles
There are three things that are required of conversation for it to become discussion in this good sense.

First of all, the subject matter being discussed must be the sort of subject matter which permits genuine discussion to take place. Not everything is discussable, and not all the things which are discussable are equally discussable. For example, facts are not discussable. If there is a question of fact, the best thing to do is to go to a reference book and look it up. You can't settle a question of fact by discussion. Ideas are discussable, and the more fundamental the ideas, the more controversial they are, the more discussable they are.

The second condition or prerequisite for good discussion is that right motive must prevail. The purpose we have in carrying on our conversation must be to learn, and if persons get engaged in serious discussion of serious themes, then their aim must be to get at the truth, not to win the argument.

The third and perhaps the most important requirement of good discussion is that we should talk to the other person, not just at them. This means that listening is important, an essential part of discussion. In fact, listening is more important, even as it is more difficult, than talking. Because if one person doesn't listen to another, what that person says in the course of the conversation is not going to be very relevant.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pericles
I just finished telling you the three basic requirements that conversation must meet if it is going to become discussion, that is profitable for learning. I would like to give you some of the rules that we have to observe to make discussion profitable in this way. These rules fall into two large groups: first, a set of rules governing the use of your mind in discussion; second, a set of rules governing the control of your emotions in discussion.

The five "intellectual" rules:

* Be relevant, which means "find out what the issue is and stick to it." Divide the issue into its parts; every complex issue has parts, and move along from one part to another.
* Don't take things for granted. State your assumptions and see if you can get the other participants to state theirs. Make an effort to find out what the other person's assumptions are.
* Try to avoid arguing fallaciously. Don't cite authority as if they were conclusions. Don't argue ad hominem -- that means, don't argue against the person as opposed to against the point. Don't say to the other person, "Oh, that's the kind of thing Republicans say or Democrats say or Socialists say," as if calling it by that kind of name necessarily proves it wrong. That is a terrible fallacy of guilt by association.
* Don't agree or disagree with the other person until you understand what that person has said. This rule requires you in the course of discussion to say to the other person, "Now let me see if I can say in my own words what you have just said." And then having done that, you turn to them and say, "Is that what you mean?" And if they say, "Yes, it is; that's exactly what I mean," then you are for the first time privileged to say, "I agree with you," or "I disagree with you," and not one moment sooner.
* If, after understanding the other person, you do disagree, state your disagreement specifically and give reasons why. You can tell the other person what is wrong with their argument in four very sharp, specific ways. You can say: 1) "You are uninformed of certain relevant facts and I will show you what they are." 2) "You are misinformed. Some of the things you think are relevant facts aren't facts at all, and I will show you why they are not." 3) "You are mistaken in your reasoning and I will show you the mistakes that you have made." 4) "You don't carry your reasoning far enough. There is more to say than you have said and I will tell you what it is." These are all very polite and much to the point.

The three "emotional" rules:

* Keep your emotions in place. That means, keep them out of the argument, for they have no place in the argument.
* Catch yourself or the other person getting angry. Starting to shout, overemphasizing the point by repeating it again and again, using sarcasm, teasing, getting a laugh on the other person, all these are signs that someone's temper is getting out of hand.
* If you can't control your emotions, at least beware of the results of emotional disorder. Realize that your emotions can lead you either to say things you don't mean, or stubbornly refuse to admit things you really do see.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pericles
The hardest thing of all to do in discussion is to know how to ask good questions, the kind of questions that by their very nature generate good discussion. This is the hardest thing because asking good questions is much, much harder than answering them.

We ought to be able to distinguish between questions of fact on the one hand, and questions of interpretation on the other. Such questions as whether something is the case or exists, and on the other hand, what it means, what it implies, what consequences it leads to.

And then we should be able to distinguish between questions of fact and questions of value. Here we ought to know if we are asking about whether something happened, or whether it was good; how someone behaves, or how they should behave; questions of what is the case, as opposed to questions about what should be or what ought to be.

It's very important to distinguish between asking someone what they think, and asking them why they think so. Asking for a statement of belief or opinion is different from asking for the reasons to support that belief or opinion. And above all, we should be able to ask hypothetical ("what if?") questions and recognize them.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pericles
histoman, I will respectfully disagree.

First, here is the dictionary definition of "debate":
a contention by words or arguments: as a : the formal discussion of a motion before a deliberative body according to the rules of parliamentary procedure b : a regulated discussion of a proposition between two matched sides

And here is the dictionary definition of "discussion":
1 : consideration of a question in open and usually informal debate
2 : a formal treatment of a topic in speech or writing

"Debate" is defined as "discussion" and vice versa, so I don't think you can claim that they are substantially different, nor can you claim that a different set of rules or guidelines should apply to each.

You are right, humor may sometimes be appropriate in a debate or a discussion. However, humor is notoriously difficult to pull off in an online setting. Since we do not have the benefit of facial expressions, tone of voice, and body language, words that were only intended in jest may be misinterpreted, and cause grave offense to others. I can tell you that your words in the Intelligent Design thread did cause offense to some of our members.

Furthermore, I am of the opinion that talk radio and the 24-hour news channels have done a great disservice to the quality of public debate in this country, by insisting that all debates must have entertainment value. Yes, it can be very entertaining to watch two people in a debate going at each other with insults, jokes, and name-calling. We are all to blame by watching and listening to such programs, and giving them high ratings and financial incentive to continue. In this forum, I would like us to do what we can, in our own small way, to reverse this trend of turning every debate into a boxing match for amusement.

I will close by quoting Dr. Adler once more. This is from the same book, in the chapter on learning:


The kind of reading [or studying] where our intention is to learn something may, of course, involve some fun. But I don’t want to give learning a false boost by saying, ‘Learning is always fun.’ It isn’t always fun. Sometimes learning is hard work. In fact, it’s quite often that. And in my own experience, it’s usually the case that when the process of learning is itself somewhat painful, the end result tends to be more profitable.
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