Lower Back Problems!

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Jiu-Jitsu101
6/17/09 9:00:03AM
I am very young and my lower back seems to hurt everytime I work out. I was wondering if their are any work outs that would improve my lower back? I dont know if it is hurting because I am working out improperly or not but please give tips to how I could make it stronger.
Joemoplata
6/18/09 11:34:11AM
I herniated two disks in my lower back early in my BJJ career and have battling with it for the past 8 years or so. What has helped the most has been concentrating on strengthening not only my back but my abs and obliques.

If you are lifting regularly, make one of your lift days just abs and lower back. Start easy by doing more concentrated lifts for your back like back extensions with little to no weight, but then you should really try to build up to things like dead lifts (proper form REQUIRED!). I like to use the Ab wheel as often as possible, that seems to target as much of my core as possible which is your concentration.

You should be good as long as you're not getting any pains or tingling sensations in your legs.
Jiu-Jitsu101
6/20/09 11:16:38AM
Thanks bro.. I'll try that out. Once again thank you very much
telnights
6/21/09 1:43:31PM
If your having low back problems my advice is to get it checked out by a doctor first before doing anything else. Trust me on this when I say you don't want to damage your back more if there is something wrong.
Joemoplata
6/22/09 11:45:17AM

Posted by telnights

If your having low back problems my advice is to get it checked out by a doctor first before doing anything else. Trust me on this when I say you don't want to damage your back more if there is something wrong.



Of course, this is sound advice. Just be careful what you hear.

It's always ironic that they send you to an orthopedic surgeon who...I know this is INSANE...recommends SURGERY.

telnights
6/23/09 5:00:08PM

Posted by Joemoplata


Posted by telnights

If your having low back problems my advice is to get it checked out by a doctor first before doing anything else. Trust me on this when I say you don't want to damage your back more if there is something wrong.



Of course, this is sound advice. Just be careful what you hear.

It's always ironic that they send you to an orthopedic surgeon who...I know this is INSANE...recommends SURGERY.




Just depends on your doctor...Its easy to say I want a non surgical fix. I would hope everyone would do the research before jumping in to surgery. But getting x-rays or a MRI before doing anything that could cause more problems in the long run is always your best bet.
Svartorm
6/29/09 5:57:00PM
Having badly injured my back 7 years ago, I did several things to fix the issue.

1. Lose weight: Not sure what your body type is, but even a small amount of belly fat will pull your lower back out of alignment.

2. Walk: It sounds like you're fairly mobile so this should be easy. Walking strengthens lower back and ab muscles, as well as helps you with the weight loss. Just be very concious of your walking posture. Straight back and head up will keep everything in alignment. Down the road, walking with a weight vest will build even better core strength.

3. Avoid violent lower body movements: If your back is hurting, avoid throwing kicks or working grappling. A kick can do serious harm to yourself, as can things like throwing up a high guard or rubber guard.

Once you've done the "light" stuff to become pain-free, you can work the abs and lower back with weights, and go back to serious grappling training. Keep in mind that, unfortunetely, the back is an injury that basically never heals fully, and once you hurt it, you'll be more prone to disk slippage or injury. You'll learn to move in a cautious manner over time, but its something you have to work at to avoid hurting yourself over and over again.
Mattchoo
6/29/09 6:10:51PM
It could even just be sunken arches in your feet which then affects your back muscles etc like stated a few above. Go to your doctor and find out properly mannn!
hippysmacker
7/24/09 7:28:12AM
If a disc is herniated I recommend a inversion table. I couldn't walk unaided ( crutches or cane) for over 6 months when my back was at its worst. Its all good now though, but the table helped me more than anything. I still use it at least 3 times day, and it not only alleviates the pressure on my spine, and separates my disc, but it actually helps keep gravity from making you shorter as you age. Pilates will also help strengthen you core immensely. Also, a lot of stretching, especially your hamstrings.
Rush
7/24/09 12:57:44PM
If your back is physiologically healthy, then I would suggest looking at things like your feet, footwear, how you walk/run, the alignment in your hips, thightness in your shoulders contributing to bad posture, look at what type of surface you sleep on, etc.

I would say that back and knee problems are often caused by another part of your body not functioning properly.

I have had three back problems (I'm 32 years old).

1) a single vertebre out of position. The physiotherapist popped it back in and I haven't trouble since. Note that I did not have success with a chiropractor.

2) Chronic sore back - Ended up being a busted spring in my matress. Got a new matress and no problems since.

3) Back spasm that left me incapacitated for 2 days - Didn't know the cause, but I did a session of cranial sacral therapy and realigned my body and haven't had a problem since, in addition to my body functioning well overall.

As of today I have no back trouble.
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