JuJitsu Styles......

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The-Don
6/18/08 7:22:14PM
OK we all hear talk about all these different styles of Jujitsu, Like Bravo, Gracie, Guerrilla and others... is there someone who can break down the different styles and highlight thier strengths and weaknesses? and how they differ from more tradational styles...
seanfu
6/18/08 9:16:35PM
Gracie relies on gi style leverage. Gracie style uses a traditional guard. The submissions and style itself is no longer evolving. Guard, closed guars, and butterfly guard tend to be the emphasis.

Bravo style is as much about improv and flexability as the Gracies are about technique over size. Bravo uses a Rubber guard as a system of its own and a replacement concept to the full guard. A lot of flexible leg subs (omo/ gogoplatas/ invisible collar/ mission control) are used and the style is better shifted to the no gi sportative style.

Guerrilla JJ is something i'm not that schooled on but I hear it involves more street tactics and judo. The system itself isn't a pure grappling system either (from what I "know" ) lol I don't know much about Guerrilla style.



Cracie style is very technical and tight. Caracie competitiors only need one opening to end a fight simply because their instructors are higher calibur.

Gracie style has become so integrated that people can usually defend whatever is thrown their way and are tearing up people from closed guard. Also Butterfly guard isn't the most solid weapon as an alternate if the Full guard fails.



Bravo is very good against ground and pound due to the half butterfly half highguard mission control. There isn't much risk to throwing triangles and other subs as the rubber guard is more dificult to pass than full guard. Most of all, Bravo style isn't mainstream yet and skilled instructors aren't going to be in all the major cities the way cracie gyms are so people might not expect it.

Bravo style isn't as tight and unless trained at 10th planet or somewhere skilled, you won't have the versatility and skill to follow through with the style. A lot of people bail out of rubber guard.

The emphasis on half guard is not good for mma. People punch you in that sport.
The-Don
6/19/08 6:49:27PM

Posted by seanfu

Gracie relies on gi style leverage. Gracie style uses a traditional guard. The submissions and style itself is no longer evolving. Guard, closed guars, and butterfly guard tend to be the emphasis.

Bravo style is as much about improv and flexability as the Gracies are about technique over size. Bravo uses a Rubber guard as a system of its own and a replacement concept to the full guard. A lot of flexible leg subs (omo/ gogoplatas/ invisible collar/ mission control) are used and the style is better shifted to the no gi sportative style.

Guerrilla JJ is something i'm not that schooled on but I hear it involves more street tactics and judo. The system itself isn't a pure grappling system either (from what I "know" ) lol I don't know much about Guerrilla style.



Cracie style is very technical and tight. Caracie competitiors only need one opening to end a fight simply because their instructors are higher calibur.

Gracie style has become so integrated that people can usually defend whatever is thrown their way and are tearing up people from closed guard. Also Butterfly guard isn't the most solid weapon as an alternate if the Full guard fails.



Bravo is very good against ground and pound due to the half butterfly half highguard mission control. There isn't much risk to throwing triangles and other subs as the rubber guard is more dificult to pass than full guard. Most of all, Bravo style isn't mainstream yet and skilled instructors aren't going to be in all the major cities the way cracie gyms are so people might not expect it.

Bravo style isn't as tight and unless trained at 10th planet or somewhere skilled, you won't have the versatility and skill to follow through with the style. A lot of people bail out of rubber guard.

The emphasis on half guard is not good for mma. People punch you in that sport.




Cool thanks... The only one I really know anything about now is Guerrilla simply cause I am in the middle of reading the book... Guerilla is a bland of Judo and Jujitsu... Basicly the speed and power of judo with the throwing techniques... it then has the same principle on the ground to go for the finish with tapouts and such not to stall out.. The nice part is the transistion.. He has created slight variations on many judo throws to allow you to maintain control on the ground with easy transistion to the jujitsu on the ground... It also involves many "Flying" moves as well... I think this style would be good for fast powerful guys ... Seems like it is good for quickly overpowering your opponent and finishing him off quickly...


fullerene
6/19/08 9:55:48PM
I think you're getting at a difference in instructors and schools more than separate styles of jiujitsu. Guerilla JJ is the style taught by David Camarillo at AKA,, Bravo JJ is the style taught by Eddie Bravo at 10th planet and Gracie JJ is more of a brand name IMO, with different family (and non-family) members teaching their own styles. In any martial art (including western boxing and wrestling) there will be certain trainers/coaches who are known to be specialists in certain strategies or to train certain styles of fighters so it's no surprise that there are some differences in these schools.

If you're looking at the variety between the three the most signifcant difference IMO would be whether most of the training is done with a gi (most Gracie affiliates) or without (Bravo, Camarillo). No-gi training tends to be more appealing to MMA practicioners while the gi styles are favored by grapplers who want to compete in traditional grappling tournaments (only).
jgtribbett
6/22/08 11:54:14AM
now.. i do about 2 days of each ... imean.. am i wasting my time with gi?
i historically perform better without a gi, but its still really fun

i am probably going to continue to do both... more mat time at tournaments and what not..
The-Don
6/22/08 3:31:35PM

Posted by jgtribbett

now.. i do about 2 days of each ... imean.. am i wasting my time with gi?
i historically perform better without a gi, but its still really fun

i am probably going to continue to do both... more mat time at tournaments and what not..



No your not waisting time... Gi training is essential.. all your great jujitsu guys pretty much all trained with a Gi... You Gi train to learn the techniques.. then you train with out a gi so you can develope the differences in them// doing BOTH is important...
bigbubbano23
6/23/08 12:49:27AM
i recently started working with a gi a found that is 10 times harder to pull off a good move with it on. i give maaad props to people who make it look easy. it's definitely a great way to improve your grappling.
VictimSix
6/23/08 2:40:38AM


No your not waisting time... Gi training is essential.. all your great jujitsu guys pretty much all trained with a Gi... You Gi train to learn the techniques.. then you train with out a gi so you can develope the differences in them// doing BOTH is important...


I don't disagree the Gi training is important but essential? If there is no interest on the persons part to learn Gi then I wouldn't be apposed to telling them to find a good sub grappling class. I'm VERY limited in a Gi because from the outset I've taken no gi classes. Though I havn't seen it hinder my game much other then if I throw on a Gi I don't know how to defend half of the subs and I can never sweep anyone. But that dosn't much matter sense I've never and will most likley never compete in a Gi.

Although I do remember when I was first starting out getting frustrated because I could seem to "lock down" on any hold or would actually loose grip on armbars. With a Gi the sweat factor is out the window. Choking sombody with your lapel is also just straight up cool.
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