Which Generation Changed Music The Most?

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POLL: which one had the biggest affect
50's (or before) 16% (5)
60's 34% (11)
70's 13% (4)
80's 19% (6)
90's 16% (5)
00's 3% (1)
89vision
5/8/08 3:54:05AM
In terms of revolutionary change in music and breaking barriers.



-Some could say the 40's-50s was the start of african americans getting into the mainstream music scene for the first time was the biggest change.

-Some could say the 60s broke the boundaries of what was "okay" to put in music and was the first era to enable swearing and "different lyrics" was the biggest change.

-Some could say the 70s because of all the genres that started up in that era, classic rock, metal, disco, punk, dub, (etcetera) was the biggest change.

-Some could say the 80s because of the drastic change in attitude in the country resulting in more extreme music, the start of death metal, hip hop, hardcore punk, techno/trance, ska, grunge, and even the opposite (crappy generic music on the radio) was the biggest change.

-Some could say the 90s because of the drastic change in originally in terms of switching up genres into ones that dont have labels, for example its hard to label a band like Sublime (even tho many try) [1986-1996] or KMFDM, or that the 90s was the beginning of amatuers making there own labels left and right (not to say it was the start but the start of prosperous self labels, was the biggest change.

-Some could say the 00's but I cant think of any reason why it could be the biggest change where other generations have done before in terms of breakins barriers, except that many things have become okay to say without PMRC "tipper stickers" now and that alot of great music has come out.











I'm gonna choose the 60s and the 80s being a close 2nd. Without the changes in the 60s many of your favorite bands wouldnt have the privilages that there are today (even tho it was inevitable) for example Black Sabbath looked up to The Doors and plenty of others and Black Sabbath is one of the cornerstones of Metal is not the 1st.
Shawn91111
5/8/08 4:42:41AM
Id say the 80's. With groups such as the Beastie Boys and Run DMC there were some great influential music coming out, even though I enjoy a vast amount of 60's music. IMO I am going with the 80's
D0wnUnd6e6r
5/8/08 7:20:42AM
Nirvana just got in there and before anybody could do anything about it they said something to do the effect of: "Hey society! we don't like that cheap mainstream noise you call music. We'll just take it, remove a couple of key notes, add some distortion and have a crazy frontman with a scruffy voice talking about deformed babies, overdosing and suicide. Oh and we'll make it good too."

IMO Nirvana changed music forever. (So basically, 90's)
browneye
5/8/08 8:59:28AM
NIRVANA had the biggest impact in such a short amount of time hats off to NIRVANA for what they accomplished
casey64
5/8/08 9:42:47AM

Posted by browneye

NIRVANA had the biggest impact in such a short amount of time hats off to NIRVANA for what they accomplished






emfleek
5/8/08 10:27:44AM
I agree with the Nirvana comments. Nothing else comes close, in my opinion.
DCRage
5/8/08 10:31:46AM
90s, as that's when the alternative genre really came to the forefront and changed everything as well as the emergence of R&B & rap/hip-hop.
AchillesHeel
5/8/08 11:04:36AM
The "Jazz Age", a.k.a. The Roaring '20s, had a greater impact than any other era, imho. Jazz introduced sexuality to music, it created the places we refer to today as "nightclubs", and essentially defined the social group we identify today as "young adults." Jazz was a radically different form of popular music, that deliberately thumbed its nose at its predecessors. Before jazz, most of us would never have gotten laid, because young, unmarried women weren't allowed in bars. Jazz even contributed to the beginnings of social integration between Whites and Blacks. I read somewhere that Prohibition-era Manhattan might have had more illegal clubs ("speakeasies") than it has bars today. Places like New York City, Chicago and Kansas City were 24-hour party zones, neck-deep in booze, drugs, and "loose" women. It didn't just change music, it changed America.
rabbit915
5/8/08 11:56:42AM

Posted by D0wnUnd6e6r

Nirvana just got in there and before anybody could do anything about it they said something to do the effect of: "Hey society! we don't like that cheap mainstream noise you call music. We'll just take it, remove a couple of key notes, add some distortion and have a crazy frontman with a scruffy voice talking about deformed babies, overdosing and suicide. Oh and we'll make it good too."

IMO Nirvana changed music forever. (So basically, 90's)




If I hear another shuffly-haired VH1 twerp pundit smirk out a sardonic little nip of garlic about how Nirvana saved us from hair metal, I’m going to swear off of bad pop-culture-based cable programming forever. Nirvana didn’t save us from shit. They just happened to wander across the teetering fulcrum of shitty eighties music and tip it towards shitty nineties music. I’m no hair metal apologist, but do you think I’m going to thank Cobain for popularizing the humorless angst-sludge that we’re still trying to get rid of today? No way. Grunge basically turned into its own form of hair-metal eventually by way of Creed and Nickelback. Am I blaming Kurt Cobain for stuff that went down way after his death? Yeah, I pretty much am. His suicide made him a martyr, and now we’ll never be rid of him, and he’s galvanized hordes of young longhairs to clench their teeth and make some really serious shit. Also, “Smells Like Teen Spirit” was and still is a major bore. I’d take Skid Row any day. At least “I’ll Remember You” moved around a little.
D0wnUnd6e6r
5/8/08 12:08:38PM

Posted by rabbit915


Posted by D0wnUnd6e6r

Nirvana just got in there and before anybody could do anything about it they said something to do the effect of: "Hey society! we don't like that cheap mainstream noise you call music. We'll just take it, remove a couple of key notes, add some distortion and have a crazy frontman with a scruffy voice talking about deformed babies, overdosing and suicide. Oh and we'll make it good too."

IMO Nirvana changed music forever. (So basically, 90's)




If I hear another shuffly-haired VH1 twerp pundit smirk out a sardonic little nip of garlic about how Nirvana saved us from hair metal, I’m going to swear off of bad pop-culture-based cable programming forever. Nirvana didn’t save us from shit. They just happened to wander across the teetering fulcrum of shitty eighties music and tip it towards shitty nineties music. I’m no hair metal apologist, but do you think I’m going to thank Cobain for popularizing the humorless angst-sludge that we’re still trying to get rid of today? No way. Grunge basically turned into its own form of hair-metal eventually by way of Creed and Nickelback. Am I blaming Kurt Cobain for stuff that went down way after his death? Yeah, I pretty much am. His suicide made him a martyr, and now we’ll never be rid of him, and he’s galvanized hordes of young longhairs to clench their teeth and make some really serious shit. Also, “Smells Like Teen Spirit” was and still is a major bore. I’d take Skid Row any day. At least “I’ll Remember You” moved around a little.



Where did I say even once that Nirvana SAVED us from anything? the topic of this thread is CHANGE not SAVE. Your starting a totally different argument here so calm down a little and go listen to some Row
AchillesHeel
5/8/08 12:12:13PM
I really hope all of these people voting for the '90s are kidding.
ohiostate1016
5/8/08 12:13:12PM
The people voting for the 90s just because of Nirvana don't know music. The 90s don't compare to the 60s, and there are a million reasons why.

First of all, The Beatles. Enough said.

Not only did the Beatles come to America, but so did a bunch of other British bands, including the Rolling Stones (in the Beatles and Stones you have the two greatest bands ever), the Dave Clark Five, The Who, The Kinks, The Animals, Herman's Hermits, and the Yardbirds (Eric Clapton). These groups continued the 50s blues traditions of artists like Muddy Waters, Bo Diddley, and B.B. King, as well as the rockabilly traditions of Elvis and Buddy Holly, and the rock traditions of Bill Haley and Jackie Brenston.

Not only was there the British Invasion (the biggest revolution in music, including grunge), but there was also psychedelic rock, with groups like The Doors, Jefferson Airplane, and solo acts including Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix. These groups defined the West Coast hippie lifestyle, and San Francisco became on of the music capitals of the world.

If you aren't a rock fan, then you can point to Motown, which was yet another HUGE music revolution. Berry Gordy's group of predominately African Americans in Detroit built on the blues traditions of the 50s and the doo wop traditions of the 40s, 50s, and 60s. The Temptations ("My Girl"), The Ronettes (Diana Ross), Smokey Robinson, Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, and the Jackson 5 were all signed to Motown and produced major hits that we still hear to this day.

And I haven't even mentioned the surf music of the Beach Boys, groups like The Velvet Underground in NYC, and more.

So yeah, Nirvana was great. But one group can't make an entire decade of music better than another, especially when the group broke up 3 years into their respective decade.
SmileR
5/8/08 1:23:50PM
I don't know how anyone can say anything other than the 60's! If you go back through musical recordings before then it was very, very different and after its basically the same stuff rehashed.

The last time something changed music so drastically was the blues impact in the 20's and 30's. The music scene went from strate laced songs about love with respect to some of the best mashes of blues rock with pop/ funk/ soul and pretty much anything else u can think of!
Theirs a reason the 60's is held in such high regard and it was the birth of pretty much every type of music thats popular today.
SmileR
5/8/08 1:29:29PM

Posted by ohiostate1016

The people voting for the 90s just because of Nirvana don't know music. The 90s don't compare to the 60s, and there are a million reasons why.

First of all, The Beatles. Enough said.

Not only did the Beatles come to America, but so did a bunch of other British bands, including the Rolling Stones (in the Beatles and Stones you have the two greatest bands ever), the Dave Clark Five, The Who, The Kinks, The Animals, Herman's Hermits, and the Yardbirds (Eric Clapton). These groups continued the 50s blues traditions of artists like Muddy Waters, Bo Diddley, and B.B. King, as well as the rockabilly traditions of Elvis and Buddy Holly, and the rock traditions of Bill Haley and Jackie Brenston.

Not only was there the British Invasion (the biggest revolution in music, including grunge), but there was also psychedelic rock, with groups like The Doors, Jefferson Airplane, and solo acts including Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix. These groups defined the West Coast hippie lifestyle, and San Francisco became on of the music capitals of the world.

If you aren't a rock fan, then you can point to Motown, which was yet another HUGE music revolution. Berry Gordy's group of predominately African Americans in Detroit built on the blues traditions of the 50s and the doo wop traditions of the 40s, 50s, and 60s. The Temptations ("My Girl"), The Ronettes (Diana Ross), Smokey Robinson, Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, and the Jackson 5 were all signed to Motown and produced major hits that we still hear to this day.

And I haven't even mentioned the surf music of the Beach Boys, groups like The Velvet Underground in NYC, and more.

So yeah, Nirvana was great. But one group can't make an entire decade of music better than another, especially when the group broke up 3 years into their respective decade.



Also this is probably the best post on this thread!
cowcatcher
5/8/08 1:55:11PM
gotta agree with the last couple of posters about the 60s and its not even close. im guessing the guys that said 90s are for the most part younger dudes. i graduated in 94 and the pop music of the time was grunge which was rehashed crap from the 70's and late 80's, think hair bands with more angst ridden whining.
Kpro
5/8/08 2:04:37PM
I personally think it is the 60's but of course you'll remember the generation that changed music the most for "you", so I understand a lot of the 90's votes.

A few of the posters in the thread so far might do well to re-read the topic. This isn't about best generation of music. So arguing that one band from one generation was better than one from another is pointless towards the topic unless you're talking about the way they "changed" music.

Everyone has their own personal preference so there isn't a wrong answer as long as you state your case.
Jackelope
5/8/08 2:43:52PM
I picked the 60's before I even read the thread.

I think if you take a look through history in the years available you'll see the most famous bands, and the most famous different kinds of bands from the 60's. Most importantly you'll see the foundations laid for rock and roll (which bands today are still trying to recreate .. miserably I might add)



iwannabesedated
5/8/08 2:49:24PM
Whats with all the Nirvana Nut-hugging...Everyone talks about them i dont even think their the best 90's band.STP,Alice in Chains,Pearl Jam and Soundgarden i think are all better bands than Nirvana.Kurt just happened to be the grunge rock posterboy..I like the Foo Fighters 1,000 times more than Nirvana.

I voted the 80's cause i was born in the 80's and the majority of bands i listen to were somewhere around in the 80's Sublime,NoFX,Descendents,GNR, Mostly 80's Punk,Ska,Metal, some bands are still making records till this day...

But in reality i cant argue the 60's love,peace,hippy-ness,and Acid..Although i dont like hippies.
teddythetuna
5/8/08 3:30:29PM
The Beatles were pioneers. also if you are mentioning the 90's TOOL and Rage Against the Machine have to be mentioned. Both > Nirvana. Grunge was a good time for music but The Melvins paved the way for most of those bands.
Rush
5/8/08 4:12:50PM
Each decade has played some influential role in shaping a particular genre or sub-section of music, but I don't think one stands out alone

If one asked a similar question about science fiction one person might say Star Wars changed sci-fi. Indeed Star Wars changed sci-fi MOVIES and POP CULTURE, but I'd argue its impact on Sci-Fi as a whole doesn't even compare to Asimov's.

Music is much more diverse than the example I gave. To put it into the context of my example, it would be like saying which era of storytelling has been the most influential? I don't think there is an answer for that and I don't think a single generation of music can be credited "changing music the most". Each era had it's own effects on specific genres of music as well as culture as a whole.

Motown had a huge influence on hiphop, R&B and some pop, but can any one take away the impact Jazz, which pre-dates mowtown, has had on music, culture and dancing? The advent of rock music is another one. Heck you could go all the way bakc to Baroque or European classical.

Each era has played significant parts in changing certain sub-sections and/or genres of music, but I don't think any single one sticks out over the others.
89vision
5/8/08 11:28:01PM
Tthe 60s (and the 80s being a close 2nd) Without the changes in the 60s many of your favorite bands wouldnt have the privilages that there are today (even tho it was inevitable) for example Black Sabbath looked up to The Doors and plenty of others in the 60s and Black Sabbath is one of the cornerstones of Metal is not the 1st.
ohiostate1016
5/9/08 9:47:19AM
Just watch Forrest Gump. Every single person on here knows every song on that movie. Whether it's "Sweet Home Alabama," "Hound Dog," "Respect," or "Turn Turn Turn." The 60s rock.
pv3Hpv3p
5/9/08 10:38:59AM
Most influential has to be 60's rock... the British invasion and the begging of rock and roll... It's easy for some people to say 80's or 90's... but IMO those are all eras and bands that built off of what was started during the 60's...

Shawn91111
5/9/08 2:56:23PM

Posted by ohiostate1016

Just watch Forrest Gump. Every single person on here knows every song on that movie. Whether it's "Sweet Home Alabama," "Hound Dog," "Respect," or "Turn Turn Turn." The 60s rock.



Isnt "Sweet Home Alabama" 70's rock?
zephead
5/10/08 9:15:48PM
The 60's. Zeppelin changed the face of music. Zeppelin effected jsut about every genre of music
89vision
5/10/08 9:20:44PM

Posted by zephead

The 60's. Zeppelin changed the face of music. Zeppelin effected jsut about every genre of music



The Doors



PS im glad nobody picks the '00s in the poll
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