Should Election Day be a national holiday?

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POLL: Should Election Day be a national holiday?
Yes 54% (13)
No 33% (8)
Don't care 13% (3)
NaturalBornKiller92
10/4/12 5:03:48PM
Someone in my history class brought this up. He stated having a national holiday would heavily benefit those who are stuck at work/school and don't have an opportunity to vote on Election Day. I thought it over a little bit. I understand you can cast an early ballot but I don't think many 19 year olds like myself find that to be too attractive of an idea.This surely nothing to sneeze at. What do you guys think?
pmoney
10/4/12 5:08:30PM
My name is P$, and I approve this message.

P.S. VOTE PMONEY IN 2020! I'ma be running this thang
airkerma
10/4/12 5:26:35PM
You should also make all opening days for sports holidays too
Bubbles
10/4/12 5:57:57PM
If I can't benefit from this, then no one can
Poor_Franklin
10/4/12 6:04:56PM
the Monday after the SuperBowl needs to be a holiday way more than election day.
Svartorm
10/4/12 6:06:15PM
My answer is no, and here's why.

I like the idea that you actually have to go out of your way to vote. You have to plan ahead to some extent, and can easily fill out an absentee ballot if you know you won't be able to vote on election day. If someone can't figure this out, I don't think their vote should count towards something that affects the rest of us.

A crazy statistic I saw years ago was that rain actually dramatically cuts the amount of people that come out to vote. If you're too afraid of rain to voice an opinion that could shape the direction of a nation, I'd be thrilled if you didn't vote at all.
pmoney
10/5/12 3:02:21AM

Posted by Svartorm

My answer is no, and here's why.

I like the idea that you actually have to go out of your way to vote. You have to plan ahead to some extent, and can easily fill out an absentee ballot if you know you won't be able to vote on election day. If someone can't figure this out, I don't think their vote should count towards something that affects the rest of us.

A crazy statistic I saw years ago was that rain actually dramatically cuts the amount of people that come out to vote. If you're too afraid of rain to voice an opinion that could shape the direction of a nation, I'd be thrilled if you didn't vote at all.




Well said. I say yes simply because I think of election day as like a Fourth of July type of day, just the embodiment of what the nation stands for. I see your point, and it's well made. The stupid vote is overwhelming IQ tests should be mandatory for anyone who wants to participate in the democratic process.

thevoodooninja
10/5/12 7:44:28AM
I'm a lazy american that doesn't vote but if I can get a paid day off work, I'll vote for that and my vote would be YES
Bubbles
10/5/12 10:05:25AM

Posted by pmoney
IQ tests should be mandatory for anyone who wants to participate in the democratic process.


Please institute this when you run for office. Then push this onto whatever fool is running Canada, or even start with a fool running a province
airkerma
10/5/12 10:10:48AM

Posted by Bubbles


Posted by pmoney
IQ tests should be mandatory for anyone who wants to participate in the democratic process.


Please institute this when you run for office. Then push this onto whatever fool is running Canada, or even start with a fool running a province


Canadian politics??????
Image Attachment(s):
Photo Attachment 1
Svartorm
10/6/12 12:28:03PM

Posted by pmoney


Posted by Svartorm

My answer is no, and here's why.

I like the idea that you actually have to go out of your way to vote. You have to plan ahead to some extent, and can easily fill out an absentee ballot if you know you won't be able to vote on election day. If someone can't figure this out, I don't think their vote should count towards something that affects the rest of us.

A crazy statistic I saw years ago was that rain actually dramatically cuts the amount of people that come out to vote. If you're too afraid of rain to voice an opinion that could shape the direction of a nation, I'd be thrilled if you didn't vote at all.




Well said. I say yes simply because I think of election day as like a Fourth of July type of day, just the embodiment of what the nation stands for. I see your point, and it's well made. The stupid vote is overwhelming IQ tests should be mandatory for anyone who wants to participate in the democratic process.




As much as people like to talk about the right to vote and all that, the original concept was that only people that owned land could vote. Hence that you had a residence and were allowed to vote in that election for your area. The underlying tone was that women, minorities, and stupid people wouldn't be allowed to affect an election because they could never own land.

Obviously it was flawed logic to an extent, but I wish inteliligence did factor into it.
meier
10/6/12 4:13:50PM
Sonnen for press secretary...lol
jjeans
10/6/12 4:25:56PM

Posted by meier

Sonnen for press secretary...lol



Not being a dick, cause I don't want you to go... But your a great big

warglory
10/6/12 4:39:56PM

Posted by Svartorm

My answer is no, and here's why.

I like the idea that you actually have to go out of your way to vote. You have to plan ahead to some extent, and can easily fill out an absentee ballot if you know you won't be able to vote on election day. If someone can't figure this out, I don't think their vote should count towards something that affects the rest of us.

A crazy statistic I saw years ago was that rain actually dramatically cuts the amount of people that come out to vote. If you're too afraid of rain to voice an opinion that could shape the direction of a nation, I'd be thrilled if you didn't vote at all.



While I agree many people in this country are apathetic towards politics, I don't think you are correct here.

The idea of making it more difficult and bureaucratic to vote defeats the purpose of voting being our most basic, fundamental right as an American citizen. A national holiday wouldn't simply give everyone an excuse to vote, it would give us a reason to celebrate the ability to vote, which we should be doing. Many people don't vote because it can be a huge pain in the ass if you have a crazy work schedule, or strenuous family obligations. I understand your logic, that these are the types of people who shouldn't vote because they don't really know what they are voting for to begin with, but that logic goes against the concept of a democracy, where everyone has a voice, not just those in the know.

If we were to celebrate our rights, like we do for the 4th of July, or Labor Day, that will make people more conscious of their rights, and give them more time to think and reflect on their opportunity.

I think a national holiday would be a great idea.
Bubbles
10/6/12 5:38:44PM

Posted by airkerma
Canadian politics??????



Rob Ford =
Svartorm
10/6/12 9:01:17PM

Posted by warglory


Posted by Svartorm

My answer is no, and here's why.

I like the idea that you actually have to go out of your way to vote. You have to plan ahead to some extent, and can easily fill out an absentee ballot if you know you won't be able to vote on election day. If someone can't figure this out, I don't think their vote should count towards something that affects the rest of us.

A crazy statistic I saw years ago was that rain actually dramatically cuts the amount of people that come out to vote. If you're too afraid of rain to voice an opinion that could shape the direction of a nation, I'd be thrilled if you didn't vote at all.



While I agree many people in this country are apathetic towards politics, I don't think you are correct here.

The idea of making it more difficult and bureaucratic to vote defeats the purpose of voting being our most basic, fundamental right as an American citizen. A national holiday wouldn't simply give everyone an excuse to vote, it would give us a reason to celebrate the ability to vote, which we should be doing. Many people don't vote because it can be a huge pain in the ass if you have a crazy work schedule, or strenuous family obligations. I understand your logic, that these are the types of people who shouldn't vote because they don't really know what they are voting for to begin with, but that logic goes against the concept of a democracy, where everyone has a voice, not just those in the know.

If we were to celebrate our rights, like we do for the 4th of July, or Labor Day, that will make people more conscious of their rights, and give them more time to think and reflect on their opportunity.

I think a national holiday would be a great idea.



Lets not kid ourselves. It would give folks a drinking holiday, and the same people that don't vote now wouldn't vote then either.

For something to have value to you, it has to require something from you. The fact that you actually have to schedule time to vote means your vote has substance and should be counted. Keep in mind that back when this country was founded, you'd have to travel miles and miles on foot to vote. The process, much like everything else in our lives since the foundation of this country was laid out, has become much easier. The process of voting today is pathetically easy in comparison, and I don't see making it even easier being a remedy for anything.

prophecy033
10/6/12 9:33:35PM
I don't think it should be a holiday. You should be able to get your votes in at some point.
warglory
10/8/12 1:54:23PM

Posted by Svartorm


Posted by warglory


Posted by Svartorm

My answer is no, and here's why.

I like the idea that you actually have to go out of your way to vote. You have to plan ahead to some extent, and can easily fill out an absentee ballot if you know you won't be able to vote on election day. If someone can't figure this out, I don't think their vote should count towards something that affects the rest of us.

A crazy statistic I saw years ago was that rain actually dramatically cuts the amount of people that come out to vote. If you're too afraid of rain to voice an opinion that could shape the direction of a nation, I'd be thrilled if you didn't vote at all.



While I agree many people in this country are apathetic towards politics, I don't think you are correct here.

The idea of making it more difficult and bureaucratic to vote defeats the purpose of voting being our most basic, fundamental right as an American citizen. A national holiday wouldn't simply give everyone an excuse to vote, it would give us a reason to celebrate the ability to vote, which we should be doing. Many people don't vote because it can be a huge pain in the ass if you have a crazy work schedule, or strenuous family obligations. I understand your logic, that these are the types of people who shouldn't vote because they don't really know what they are voting for to begin with, but that logic goes against the concept of a democracy, where everyone has a voice, not just those in the know.

If we were to celebrate our rights, like we do for the 4th of July, or Labor Day, that will make people more conscious of their rights, and give them more time to think and reflect on their opportunity.

I think a national holiday would be a great idea.



Lets not kid ourselves. It would give folks a drinking holiday, and the same people that don't vote now wouldn't vote then either.

For something to have value to you, it has to require something from you. The fact that you actually have to schedule time to vote means your vote has substance and should be counted. Keep in mind that back when this country was founded, you'd have to travel miles and miles on foot to vote. The process, much like everything else in our lives since the foundation of this country was laid out, has become much easier. The process of voting today is pathetically easy in comparison, and I don't see making it even easier being a remedy for anything.




You had to walk/ride/carriage your way to anywhere in the country back then, whether you were voting or not, so I am not sure how comparing the limited transportation methods of 18th century America to now is relevant, especially considering modern day American's lives are infinitely more complicated than they were 250 years ago. Not to mention, as you have also previously mentioned, most Americans didn't have the right to vote at that time anyway.

You are perhaps right that many people would drink/bbq if it was a holiday, but voter turnout would be far higher than it would be otherwise. Memorial Day is an excuse for many to hang out in their backyards and BBQ, but there are also millions of Americans who attend parades and other events to reflect on the meaning of that holiday, so I am fairly certain many folks would take advantage of a holiday, to go out and vote.
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