Diet Question

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The_Metal_Maniac
7/30/09 2:24:09PM
I would like to get back on a 1500 to 1700 calorie a diet. It seems that they never pan out the way I intend them to. I am 170lb and would like to get to 160 to 155lbs. I work out at the gym about four to five times a week with free weights, resistance, and cardio (sometimes). However I am lacking in the knowledge department of nutrition. For instance on a 1700 calorie diet whats the proper amount of total fat, sodium, carbs, protein, sugars I should be taking in. Also I bought Myofusion protein as a meal supplement primary and I have NO Xplode. Any guidance would be appreciated.
Joemoplata
7/30/09 11:55:08PM
What's your intention for losing the weight? I ask only because weight is a relative factor unless you're cutting to hit a certain weight class.
The_Metal_Maniac
7/31/09 12:45:42AM

Posted by Joemoplata

What's your intention for losing the weight? I ask only because weight is a relative factor unless you're cutting to hit a certain weight class.



vanity

I'm actually just trying to get into shape. Ten to twelve pounds seems like a justifiable weight loss for me.
Rush
7/31/09 3:23:52PM
It's really tough to say because every person is different. For example, I am 165lbs usually and for me to drop below 160, takes running 20-30 miles a week for about two months in addition to eating well, which I do normally anyways.

Now, considering you have the time to do this, I am going to give you some advice that may seem to take longer in the beginning, but could potentially save you a lot of trouble in the long run.

Now, I will stress that every body is different. You may not be able to reach that goal or yours or if you do, it may be hard for you to maintain it. For example, when I dropped below 160 lbs when training for my brown belt test and marathon at the same time, I was training 7-9 times a week. I was ripped, but I gained the weight back after my test and race at about the same rate I lost it (1 lb a week) and now I am back at what I call my active weight.

What I define as active weight is your walking weight when you work out (real work outs, not going to the gym and doing 5 sets of weights and talking the rest of the time.) and eat healthy (I mean not being too restrictive, but being smart about your food intake; no fast food or fried food, cut down your sugar and salt intake, don't eat late at night, eat your fibre, drink water, etc.). Now, in my opinion, your active weight is a weight you should be able to maintain and your body will be stable in terms of weight.

Now, if you ramp up your exercise and have a more restrictive diet, you should be able to shave about 5% more of your body weight off. By ramping up I mean 6+ workouts a week with at least one of them containing 60min+ of aerobic exercise (that is keeping your heart rate at about 60-70% max for 1 hour or more). By restrictive diet I mean cut down the total intake of food and be even more careful with what you eat.

In my experience, and like I said every body is different, I can comfortably maintain my active weight, but have a hard time maintaining a weight that is 5% less than that. That's the way my body is. I suggest you figure out what your active weight is, and see what it takes to reach your goal and maintain it. If you have to work like I do to maintain it, I would suggest being comfortable with your active weight and be happy that you are healthy.

In case I didn' t give you the answer you wanted, here are some general healthy diet tips

Do not eat fast food or processed food (any food that comes prepared in a box is not good for you)
stay away from foods with high salt and or sugar (avoid pop, canned food, sweats, etc)
stay away from fried food
get lots of sleep
drink lots of water - your liver helps you metabolize fats and it can do its job much better when you are not dehydrated
eat lots of fibre. It's healthy and helps maintain good digestion.
make sure you get lots of good fat in your diet. Flax seed oil, canola oil and olive oil
don't eat or drink later at night unless it's water
relax and enjoy life. being stressed only hinders weight loss.

edit- forgot to add to avoid beer and other alcohol. They are high in calories, but also dehydrate you which hinders weight loss.
The_Metal_Maniac
8/3/09 12:38:13AM

Posted by Rush

It's really tough to say because every person is different. For example, I am 165lbs usually and for me to drop below 160, takes running 20-30 miles a week for about two months in addition to eating well, which I do normally anyways.

Now, considering you have the time to do this, I am going to give you some advice that may seem to take longer in the beginning, but could potentially save you a lot of trouble in the long run.

Now, I will stress that every body is different. You may not be able to reach that goal or yours or if you do, it may be hard for you to maintain it. For example, when I dropped below 160 lbs when training for my brown belt test and marathon at the same time, I was training 7-9 times a week. I was ripped, but I gained the weight back after my test and race at about the same rate I lost it (1 lb a week) and now I am back at what I call my active weight.

What I define as active weight is your walking weight when you work out (real work outs, not going to the gym and doing 5 sets of weights and talking the rest of the time.) and eat healthy (I mean not being too restrictive, but being smart about your food intake; no fast food or fried food, cut down your sugar and salt intake, don't eat late at night, eat your fibre, drink water, etc.). Now, in my opinion, your active weight is a weight you should be able to maintain and your body will be stable in terms of weight.

Now, if you ramp up your exercise and have a more restrictive diet, you should be able to shave about 5% more of your body weight off. By ramping up I mean 6+ workouts a week with at least one of them containing 60min+ of aerobic exercise (that is keeping your heart rate at about 60-70% max for 1 hour or more). By restrictive diet I mean cut down the total intake of food and be even more careful with what you eat.

In my experience, and like I said every body is different, I can comfortably maintain my active weight, but have a hard time maintaining a weight that is 5% less than that. That's the way my body is. I suggest you figure out what your active weight is, and see what it takes to reach your goal and maintain it. If you have to work like I do to maintain it, I would suggest being comfortable with your active weight and be happy that you are healthy.

In case I didn' t give you the answer you wanted, here are some general healthy diet tips

Do not eat fast food or processed food (any food that comes prepared in a box is not good for you)
stay away from foods with high salt and or sugar (avoid pop, canned food, sweats, etc)
stay away from fried food
get lots of sleep
drink lots of water - your liver helps you metabolize fats and it can do its job much better when you are not dehydrated
eat lots of fibre. It's healthy and helps maintain good digestion.
make sure you get lots of good fat in your diet. Flax seed oil, canola oil and olive oil
don't eat or drink later at night unless it's water
relax and enjoy life. being stressed only hinders weight loss.

edit- forgot to add to avoid beer and other alcohol. They are high in calories, but also dehydrate you which hinders weight loss.



An extremely informative post. Thanks man, props for sure.
Joemoplata
8/3/09 1:38:24PM
What Rush said!

LOL!

I would add to that already brilliant post, that using weight as a measure of success in your case may not be the best plan of attack. You could lose 10 pounds of body fat but add 15 pounds of muscle and look great, but weight more. This is an extreme example, but you get the point.

I would recommend using any number of methods for measuring your body fat percentage and make sure it's going down. This might be a better measure of success for you that simply how much you weigh.
Rush
8/4/09 9:24:16AM

Posted by Joemoplata

What Rush said!

LOL!

I would add to that already brilliant post, that using weight as a measure of success in your case may not be the best plan of attack. You could lose 10 pounds of body fat but add 15 pounds of muscle and look great, but weight more. This is an extreme example, but you get the point.

I would recommend using any number of methods for measuring your body fat percentage and make sure it's going down. This might be a better measure of success for you that simply how much you weigh.




Yes good point. I want to clarify that in my post when I refer to weight, I am referring to it in lieu of mass muscle building.
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