The correct way to take your opponent down?

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NatedawgThaM
9/26/07 4:56:54PM
Okay look, I am CONFUSED!!! I took wrestling last year and they tell you the correct way how they think you should take your opponent won. But in my MMA class they tell you the complete opposite of what my wrestling coach told me to do.

The way my wrestling coach tells us...

Say you were in the southpaw stance since that's my stance and your opponent is in the same stance. You are standing on the outside of your opponent to the left. My wrestling coach says to drop down with that inside leg and drop to a knee and wrap around your opponents legs to take him down...


But my MMA sensi say this...

Standing from the south paw stance once again and so is your opponent. This time instead of dropping the inside foot you drop the outside foot and drive to your right while moving your head to the right and drive your opponent to the match.

The way my sensi says it sounds good to me if I'm going for a single but in MMA I fear doing his way I can eat a knee or head kick....

I know people have there different ways to take there opponent down but somebody just tell me the more common one of the one that works the best....

Thanks
postman
9/26/07 5:38:00PM
I never drop down I usually throw a combo then do a walk threw take down or throw a combo grab a leg and pull it up while throwing a forearm to the chest.
loonytnt
9/26/07 5:52:17PM
this a double leg?
NatedawgThaM
9/26/07 5:58:06PM

Posted by loonytnt

this a double leg?



Yeah...
postman
9/26/07 6:09:05PM
oh sorry my fault. I try to stay away from them to. I always seem to get in the gillotine when I go for doubles but thats just me.
Jackelope
9/26/07 7:29:05PM
There's no solid one single way to take somebody down, of course. If there was that's all you would see guys do. There's a lot of factors including eating knees, ending up in dominant position on the ground, and as others have mentioned risk of getting caught in a submission.

I'm not the best person to ask on this subject since I'm not an experienced MMA fighter, but I have done several years of wrestling, several years of stand up, and a bit of BJJ. The one thing I can say is to keep an open mind and go with what works best for you.
Schizoidman
9/27/07 12:21:11AM
Or just force your way into a Greco clench, get double under-hooks, and slam his ass. Seriously though, there are many different ways. Double legs can be dangerous, but they're good to have in your back pocket. Keep experimenting. Whatever works and feels comfortable, use it. Don't just stick to certain types of take downs, though. The more versatile the better.
ncordless
9/27/07 1:05:22AM
I am having a tough time visualizing exactly what you are describing in your descriptions of the takedowns. I'll try to give you some general advice and see if that clears it up.

The classic head outside double leg, (meaning your head is to the side of your opponents body, as opposed to in between your opponent's legs) is executed in the following way:
1. Lower your base so that the tops of your shoulders are at or below your opponent's waist. The way you acheive that lowered position is by lungeing forward with the leg on the same side as your head. You're weight should be shifted onto that leg and away from the leg that is behind. That way you don't stall out in your drive through your opponent. ex: If your head is on your left. Your left leg should be forward with weight on it. The right leg may be touching the ground at the knee, but your weight distribution is forward and to the left.
2. Wrap your arms around both his legs at just above the knee. Pull his legs towards your chest.
3. Drive your inside shoulder into his groin. Sounds rough, but as my wrestling coach told me, "It works, it's not illegal, so do it."
4. Drive forward with your outside leg. Step forward with your inside leg. You probably practiced this in wrestling. My coach called it "kneewalking". Keep your momentum going forward, slightly up, and towards your opponent. Keep "knee walking" until your opponent goes down.

Two things that I am not sure of in the crossover to MMA.
1. A wrestling stance is usually more squared up than a striking stance. Having a lead foot would probably mean that you have to take your inital step with the back foot to get the kind of drive you'll need.
2. I would think that having your inside knee to the ground would prevent you from a knee to the face, but to do a double leg correctly the whole thing needs to be one fluid motion. You might be vulnerable to a knee, but this is how I've seen Sherk, Coleman and Kos do it.

As far as the MMA takedown you described, it sounds kind of like the double leg they "taught" me in BJJ. I think it is competely worthless and impractical, but I'll describe it to you in case this is the takedown you are describing.
1. Lower your base, by basically squatting.
2. Place your head to one side of your opponent.
3. Sweep the legs with your arms, pulling the feet towards your outside.

IMO, taking someone down this way doesn't work unless you are completely belly to belly. Squatting does not give any momentum, which means your arms are doing to much of the work. Anytime your are relying on the strength of your arms against an opponents legs, you are doing something wrong.

The only thing I can say for the second takedown is that you are not as committed when you try it. If you get sprawled on with the second takedown, you are probably going to end up on your back, in guard. If you allow yourself to get sprawled on with the first takedown, then they are probably going to take your back if they spin.

The thing is, if you really just keep driving with the first takedown, you're going to go out of bounds or hit the fence, so that really shouldn't be an issue. It's all about perfecting each step and then putting them together as one fluid continuous motion that only ends when your opponent hits something, either a wall or a floor.

Hope this helps.
NatedawgThaM
9/27/07 1:13:06AM

Posted by ncordless

I am having a tough time visualizing exactly what you are describing in your descriptions of the takedowns. I'll try to give you some general advice and see if that clears it up.

The classic head outside double leg, (meaning your head is to the side of your opponents body, as opposed to in between your opponent's legs) is executed in the following way:
1. Lower your base so that the tops of your shoulders are at or below your opponent's waist. The way you acheive that lowered position is by lungeing forward with the leg on the same side as your head. You're weight should be shifted onto that leg and away from the leg that is behind. That way you don't stall out in your drive through your opponent. ex: If your head is on your left. Your left leg should be forward with weight on it. The right leg may be touching the ground at the knee, but your weight distribution is forward and to the left.
2. Wrap your arms around both his legs at just above the knee. Pull his legs towards your chest.
3. Drive your inside shoulder into his groin. Sounds rough, but as my wrestling coach told me, "It works, it's not illegal, so do it."
4. Drive forward with your outside leg. Step forward with your inside leg. You probably practiced this in wrestling. My coach called it "kneewalking". Keep your momentum going forward, slightly up, and towards your opponent. Keep "knee walking" until your opponent goes down.

Two things that I am not sure of in the crossover to MMA.
1. A wrestling stance is usually more squared up than a striking stance. Having a lead foot would probably mean that you have to take your inital step with the back foot to get the kind of drive you'll need.
2. I would think that having your inside knee to the ground would prevent you from a knee to the face, but to do a double leg correctly the whole thing needs to be one fluid motion. You might be vulnerable to a knee, but this is how I've seen Sherk, Coleman and Kos do it.

As far as the MMA takedown you described, it sounds kind of like the double leg they "taught" me in BJJ. I think it is competely worthless and impractical, but I'll describe it to you in case this is the takedown you are describing.
1. Lower your base, by basically squatting.
2. Place your head to one side of your opponent.
3. Sweep the legs with your arms, pulling the feet towards your outside.

IMO, taking someone down this way doesn't work unless you are completely belly to belly. Squatting does not give any momentum, which means your arms are doing to much of the work. Anytime your are relying on the strength of your arms against an opponents legs, you are doing something wrong.

The only thing I can say for the second takedown is that you are not as committed when you try it. If you get sprawled on with the second takedown, you are probably going to end up on your back, in guard. If you allow yourself to get sprawled on with the first takedown, then they are probably going to take your back if they spin.

The thing is, if you really just keep driving with the first takedown, you're going to go out of bounds or hit the fence, so that really shouldn't be an issue. It's all about perfecting each step and then putting them together as one fluid continuous motion that only ends when your opponent hits something, either a wall or a floor.

Hope this helps.



That BJJ takedonw sounds right..It's confusing as crap but THANKS MAN! HUGE HELP! I can't thank yo enough!!!
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