Boxing Personalities Talk UFC 131 Striking Technique

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Budgellism
6/14/11 5:43:04PM
UFC 131 saw some solid displays of striking take place in the Octagon, but some of the reaction left me wondering what some boxing personalities would think of the punches thrown during the event. Lucky for me, I didn't even have to do any legwork as a few interesting statements have come out over the past few days.

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40ouncetpkid
6/14/11 9:01:15PM
hahaha wow Howard Davis definitely has taken too many punches. Good thing he ducked Aaron Pryor.
Playground_Samurai
6/14/11 10:56:43PM

Posted by 40ouncetpkid

hahaha wow Howard Davis definitely has taken too many punches. Good thing he ducked Aaron Pryor.



Whatever. Love the respect for Chuck.
40ouncetpkid
6/15/11 1:24:39AM

Posted by gspfan


Posted by 40ouncetpkid

hahaha wow Howard Davis definitely has taken too many punches. Good thing he ducked Aaron Pryor.



Whatever. Love the respect for Chuck.



What? He was an exciting fighter but come on it is absolutely absurd to use Chuck as an example of great boxing technique because that is absolutely ridiculous. He probably has the ugliest technique I've ever seen in my life.

I agree with not being afraid and getting them out of there but you just can't say Liddell has good technique.
Adrenaline
6/15/11 6:35:57AM

Posted by 40ouncetpkid


Posted by gspfan


Posted by 40ouncetpkid

hahaha wow Howard Davis definitely has taken too many punches. Good thing he ducked Aaron Pryor.



Whatever. Love the respect for Chuck.



What? He was an exciting fighter but come on it is absolutely absurd to use Chuck as an example of great boxing technique because that is absolutely ridiculous. He probably has the ugliest technique I've ever seen in my life.

I agree with not being afraid and getting them out of there but you just can't say Liddell has good technique.




Your right, Chuck is not a great example of pure boxing technique but that was not the point of what Howard Davis Jr. was trying to say. He was complimenting Liddell on his killer instinct and for not screwing around, Chuck, win or lose went in there to do one thing....knock your damn block off. He was not comparing striking between the three, he was saying that Chuck would have went for broke after smelling blood, and he felt like JDS did not after the first. (Personally I think JDS was playing a little safe but also Carwin just has a huge heart and would not quit)



AchillesHeel
6/15/11 12:15:00PM
I don't know a lot about boxing, but I've always wondered about this.

I see something similar with wrestling. Every time Joe Rogan raves about how amazing so-and-so is at wrestling, I feel like reminding everyone that GSP probably won't make the Canadian Olympic team for 2012 (and Canada didn't win a single medal in 2008), Chael Sonnen was an alternate for the US team, and Gray Maynard failed to qualify at all. International-level wrestlers are way beyond the best wrestlers in the UFC. I can only assume that pro boxers would school MMA fighters in striking.
fullerene
6/16/11 8:02:18PM

Posted by AchillesHeel
I can only assume that pro boxers would school MMA fighters in striking.


You assume correctly...if they had a chance to box.

But it was proven very early in the sport that was not enough. Think about the gap in boxing talent (and weight) between Art Jimmerson and Royce Gracie or James Warring and Renzo Gracie or between Antonio Inoki and Mohammed Ali or Tom Erikson and Matt Skelton. The difference almost can't be exagerrated and yet the guy who was completely overmatched won because of their jiu jitsu or wrestling prowess.

The very best wrestlers in the world will be focusing 100% on wrestling for the prime of their careers and, as a result, they won't learn the requisite boxing/kickboxing and jiu-jitsu to compete at the highest levels of MMA. The very best boxers in the world will have spent 100% of their focus on boxing and not know how to wrestle or do jiu-jitsu well enough to compete at the highest levels of MMA.

If you're looking for someone who trained exclusively at some other sport--boxing, wrestling, football, rugby, etc. to come in and smash everyone in the MMA circuit, don't hold your breath. People have been (wrongly) expecting that for years. But if you expect a young guy to fight as an amateur boxer at the same time he trains jiu-jitsu and come along in a few years boxing the ears off of the current crop of MMA fighters then I think you're going to be vindicated.
40ouncetpkid
6/16/11 8:35:39PM

Posted by fullerene


Posted by AchillesHeel
I can only assume that pro boxers would school MMA fighters in striking.


You assume correctly...if they had a chance to box.

But it was proven very early in the sport that was not enough. Think about the gap in boxing talent (and weight) between Art Jimmerson and Royce Gracie or James Warring and Renzo Gracie or between Antonio Inoki and Mohammed Ali or Tom Erikson and Matt Skelton. The difference almost can't be exagerrated and yet the guy who was completely overmatched won because of their jiu jitsu or wrestling prowess.

The very best wrestlers in the world will be focusing 100% on wrestling for the prime of their careers and, as a result, they won't learn the requisite boxing/kickboxing and jiu-jitsu to compete at the highest levels of MMA. The very best boxers in the world will have spent 100% of their focus on boxing and not know how to wrestle or do jiu-jitsu well enough to compete at the highest levels of MMA.

If you're looking for someone who trained exclusively at some other sport--boxing, wrestling, football, rugby, etc. to come in and smash everyone in the MMA circuit, don't hold your breath. People have been (wrongly) expecting that for years. But if you expect a young guy to fight as an amateur boxer at the same time he trains jiu-jitsu and come along in a few years boxing the ears off of the current crop of MMA fighters then I think you're going to be vindicated.



Good post and I agree.

I am one of those rare people that would rather come in with a strong striking base instead of a wrestling base and thats because all fights start standing, you're use to taking punishment whereas a lot of wrestlers & BJJ guys fold when they get hit hard. Plus theirs more good wrestlers then good strikers out there. I feel theirs a better chance you'll be outwrestled by somebody if your coming in with a strong wrestler pace then running into somebody that's going to outstrike you.

I know a lot of wrestlers can adapt to BJJ fast but it's more effective for a striker to learn it IMO because even for a wrestler if your on top I feel like it's easier to get submissions off your back then it is on top especially since a lot of people are defensive as hell when they get taken down and most people in the UFC are good at keeping you from passing guard and it's hard as hell to tap somebody from guard on top where their's several ways to submitt somebody off your back.

Thats just me though I love offense over control.
40ouncetpkid
6/16/11 8:44:51PM
Also I'd like to add timing > control IMO.

You notice how if you watch boxing or MMA they ALWAYS stress it and say the punch that you don't see coming is the one that hurts the most. Your striking senses will be sharp whereas if a wrestler tries to gain some stand up he's still novice and his timing won't be as sharp and the speed and reflexes aren't as good as somebody coming in as a striker.

But that's just on overall true MMA. if I was going to be in the UFC someday I'd rather be a wrestler ONLY because of their scoring. All you need to do to win a UFC fight is be aggressive and be on top and you win, BJJ doesn't matter AT ALL unless you actually tap them out, they dont even care about attempts.

But for true MMA like over in Japan, striking all the way...
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