Full body workouts

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Jackelope
3/31/08 2:20:20AM
Lately I've had some more commitments than usual, so I've been working out in the gym only 3 days a week compared to my usual 5. I have been doing it just like I used to do my workouts (push muscles, pull muscles, legs) but I've been curious about trying out a 3 days a week full body program.

Supposedly they're fun, less time consuming, and pretty productive. Anybody here ever done a 3 day full body workout?

I'm thinking of starting tomorrow with this-

Dumbbell press x 4 (sets)
Military press x 4
Bent over rows x 4
Preacher curls x 4
Dips x 4
Abs exercises x 4
Squats x 4
Calf raises x 4

Possibly adding in some pull ups in the middle there if I feel up to it. I'm not sure how much all of this will get me on the fatigue level. I plan on pushing with enough weight (probably 80% of 1RM) so that I'm struggling through the whole thing. I've been a gym rat for 10 years off and on, so I'd consider myself advanced level, but not exactly a "pro"

What are your thoughts on this program and the 3 day a week full body programs in general?
hotrodttt
3/31/08 2:53:16AM
Me and my brother, before he went to Iraq did these Workouts called Burners that we got from doing Cross Fit. You only need to do tis 1 Time a week because You'll be sore for the rest.

100 Strait Pull Ups - Run 1/4 of a Mile
100 Strait Push Ups - Run 1/4 of a Mile
100 Strait Sit Ups not crunches - Run 1/4 of a Mile
100 Straight Air Squats - Run 1/4 of a Mile

So now you have been worked full body and Ran a Mile

seanfu
3/31/08 3:22:39AM
I wouldn't recommend it. Don't know how to get around it but I wouldn't recommend it.
Rush
3/31/08 9:52:13AM
I don't know about those workouts because I haven't done them myself, but I am an advocate of the full body workout. It's great for endurance and great for people (like me) that don't want to spend a ton of time in the gym sitting around recovering.


Right now most of what I do is kettlebell and running. I still go to the gym and do yoga, high resistance elliptical cross training and cycling as well as my ab workouts, but I still superset all of those.


Here is my kettle bell workout. Sometimes I do it without the stairs.

-Run two whole buildings worth of stairs in my apt. That is 12 floors each floor with 16 steps.
-Then I "run" 8 floors carrying a 24kg and a 20kg kettlebell (one in each hand). This is really tough.
-At the top floor (where there is a higher ceiling) I do my kettlebell workout
1) Two arm swings, 20 reps with 20kg, immediately followed by 20 reps with 24kg
2) 15 one arm swings without the flip over in each arm with 24kg
3) 15 hip rotations in each direction (like a hammer throw without spinning) with 24kg
4) two arm swings over head 15 reps with 24kg
5) 10 reps of cleans on each side 24kg
6) 15 rapid snatches (classic style with two hands)
7) 50 reps of what I call "around the world" (see below) - 24kg
8) one arm swings with flip - 24kg as many reps as I can

** around the world is an exercise I "invented" where you stand with feet a little more than shoulder width apart, you swing the kettlebell around your waist in a circular motion in one direction, passing it to the other hand to complete the revolution. I do about 25 clockwise and 25 counter clockwise rotations. This helps work hand-eye coordination as well as your grip. It is what I also consider a "rest" exercise.

In between these 8 sets, I do about 5 sets of stair hopping. Each set consists of 6 flights of stairs (each with 8 steps) 2 flights one step at a time, 2 sets two stairs at a time, 2 sets of three, two three steps at a time.

Usually the most I will rest in between sets is about 15-20 sec to catch my breath.


The version that I do without stair running, I add two or three exercises to the kettlebell routine and take off number 9) (because I do them in the apt and the ceiling is not as high)

10) bench press style push, lying on my back. When the weather is warmer and I go outside this will be replaced by a basketball style throw.
11) again lying flat on my back (or on a Swiss/yoga ball) I do a pullover style exercise. This is tough on the ball
12) the first half of the Turkish getup.


Jackelope
3/31/08 1:04:09PM

Posted by hotrodttt

Me and my brother, before he went to Iraq did these Workouts called Burners that we got from doing Cross Fit. You only need to do tis 1 Time a week because You'll be sore for the rest.

100 Strait Pull Ups - Run 1/4 of a Mile
100 Strait Push Ups - Run 1/4 of a Mile
100 Strait Sit Ups not crunches - Run 1/4 of a Mile
100 Straight Air Squats - Run 1/4 of a Mile

So now you have been worked full body and Ran a Mile




The pull ups and the air squats might get me sore, but 100 push ups and 100 sit ups isn't going to do jack for me at this point. Before I left the Army I was doing 112 push ups in 2 minutes and 103 situps. Only reason I couldn't do more in those 2 minutes (each exercise) is because time ran out. How do you even do 100 straight pull ups? I can bust out around 24 pull ups (undergrip) a set. Not sure even if I split it into 5 different sets if I could get to 100, though.

Besides, right now I've got a gym membership and I like using the weights, haha.


I wouldn't recommend it. Don't know how to get around it but I wouldn't recommend it.


Supposedly if you do these specific kinds of exercises there's no detriment to it. All the movements are compound movements, so accessory muscles get used. If I have time certain days I figure I'll throw in a couple workouts to maintain the common weaknesses. Like rotator cuffs, hip abductors, erector spinae, etc. Plus, I've been doing the "focus" on body parts workouts for so long now that I think it'll be good to change things up.

Have you ever read anything bad or something like that about these kinds of workouts? I looked but couldn't find anything with any real weight to it. I'd love to read just to expand my knowledge if you know of something, though.


I don't know about those workouts because I haven't done them myself, but I am an advocate of the full body workout. It's great for endurance and great for people (like me) that don't want to spend a ton of time in the gym sitting around recovering.


I've never done Kettle bells. They sound like a lot of fun. I hope my gym gets some in there so I can start trying them out. When you were talking about using different weights in each hand for "running" the stairs I was wondering if you do that for core strength, or if that's just the bells you have so that's what you do?

My understanding of kettlebells is that it's pretty much all isometric movement and core strength stuff. Is that true? I've never really studied them but that's the general impression that I get.
Rush
3/31/08 1:20:14PM

Posted by Jackelope

I've never done Kettle bells. They sound like a lot of fun. I hope my gym gets some in there so I can start trying them out. When you were talking about using different weights in each hand for "running" the stairs I was wondering if you do that for core strength, or if that's just the bells you have so that's what you do?

My understanding of kettlebells is that it's pretty much all isometric movement and core strength stuff. Is that true? I've never really studied them but that's the general impression that I get.




Kettlebells are fun to use. I don't lift weights (barbells and dumbells) at all.

Kettlebells are mostly for core strength, but some exercises do work your shoulders and arms too.

Carrying the kettlebells up the stairs is mostly a leg workout, in which your thighs, hamstrings and gluts are part of your core (core is defined as between your lower chest and knees - anterior and posterior).

In my experience, the two places the kettlebells isolate the least are your chest and biceps. However, I am working on exercises that work chest (the basketball toss). Biceps are a small muscle group and I don't think they need to be worked that much, so I feel that what I get by doing the other exercises will be sufficient for my biceps. I could also work these groups more with a medicine ball, but I am having trouble finding one that I can afford. I may just have to bite the bullet.

Kettlebell workouts are the opposite of isometric. They are more concentric, eccentric and plyometric, which are better for developing strength. My core strength has improved about 15-20% since I started using kettlebells. I've noticed it in my ab workouts and yoga classes. Another thing that kettlebell workouts teach you is how to move through your core, which is great for grappling.

I have three kettlebells: 12kg, 20kg and 24kg. The lightest one is for certain exercises that are tough, but is mostly for my wife. I started with the 20kg and moved to the 24kg within a month or two. I'd like to move up to the 28kg by the end of the summer if I can find a place that sells one.


The key with kettlebells is that you have to feel the weight for them to be effective. Just increasing the number of reps doesn't help. Besides, I find that the limiting factor in some of my exercises tends to be my grip.
Jackelope
3/31/08 1:45:55PM

Posted by Rush


Posted by Jackelope

I've never done Kettle bells. They sound like a lot of fun. I hope my gym gets some in there so I can start trying them out. When you were talking about using different weights in each hand for "running" the stairs I was wondering if you do that for core strength, or if that's just the bells you have so that's what you do?

My understanding of kettlebells is that it's pretty much all isometric movement and core strength stuff. Is that true? I've never really studied them but that's the general impression that I get.





Carrying the kettlebells up the stairs is mostly a leg workout, in which your thighs, hamstrings and gluts are part of your core (core is defined as between your lower chest and knees - anterior and posterior).



LOL I know the kettle bells up the stairs is for legs. I'm not a complete tard. HAHAHA Sorry but that was just funny. I meant do you use a different weight in each hand so that your center of gravity is off balance and you have to use your core to maintain an upright position while going through a complex movement (climbing stairs) ? you said you use a different weight in each hand (one weighing more than the other) so I was curious why you do that.

When I said they were isometric I meant it in the sense that let's say you're throwing them up and away from your body to the side (I've seen this done in some videos... although again, I've never trained with Kettle bells) When you reach the peak of your extension, doesn't the ball flip onto the opposite side of the handle? At which point you would have to use your opposing muscle to slow the momentum of the ball flipping so it doesn't crush your wrist on the opposite side? Not a completely isometric exercise, but you see what I'm getting at?

Rush
3/31/08 3:38:57PM

Posted by Jackelope

LOL I know the kettle bells up the stairs is for legs. I'm not a complete tard. HAHAHA Sorry but that was just funny. I meant do you use a different weight in each hand so that your center of gravity is off balance and you have to use your core to maintain an upright position while going through a complex movement (climbing stairs) ? you said you use a different weight in each hand (one weighing more than the other) so I was curious why you do that.




Sorry, I didn't mean to imply that. I misinterpreted your question. No, the only reason I have different weight in each hand is because I don't have two kettlebells that weigh the same. I would prefer to use a balanced weight.



Posted by Jackelope

When I said they were isometric I meant it in the sense that let's say you're throwing them up and away from your body to the side (I've seen this done in some videos... although again, I've never trained with Kettle bells) When you reach the peak of your extension, doesn't the ball flip onto the opposite side of the handle? At which point you would have to use your opposing muscle to slow the momentum of the ball flipping so it doesn't crush your wrist on the opposite side? Not a completely isometric exercise, but you see what I'm getting at?





Most of the exercises I mentioned above do not require the flipping over of the kettlebell.

The basic swing motion with a flip over, is accomplished by pushing up (with your palm) at the very end of the swing (when your arm is vertical). So in effect you are swinging your wrist around the kettlebell, instead of the kettlebell swinging around your hand. If you just let the kettlebell swing around your hand, it will smash you in the forearm and cause nasty bruises. I think of the motion as chasing the kettlebell rather than using muscles to slow the kettlebell down.

The cleans have a bit of a flip that involve more of a wrist rotation rather than a push.
hippysmacker
3/31/08 4:12:43PM

Posted by Jackelope

Lately I've had some more commitments than usual, so I've been working out in the gym only 3 days a week compared to my usual 5. I have been doing it just like I used to do my workouts (push muscles, pull muscles, legs) but I've been curious about trying out a 3 days a week full body program.

Supposedly they're fun, less time consuming, and pretty productive. Anybody here ever done a 3 day full body workout?

I'm thinking of starting tomorrow with this-

Dumbbell press x 4 (sets)
Military press x 4
Bent over rows x 4
Preacher curls x 4
Dips x 4
Abs exercises x 4
Squats x 4
Calf raises x 4

Possibly adding in some pull ups in the middle there if I feel up to it. I'm not sure how much all of this will get me on the fatigue level. I plan on pushing with enough weight (probably 80% of 1RM) so that I'm struggling through the whole thing. I've been a gym rat for 10 years off and on, so I'd consider myself advanced level, but not exactly a "pro"

What are your thoughts on this program and the 3 day a week full body programs in general?



I used to be a personal trainer, so I will weigh in on this. The key to full body workouts or any total circuit is that it isn't really about building muscle mass. This will work , and yes I would I wold add a lat exercise to it, a pullup or lat pull down of some kind - if you have machines. Also , heavy weight is not needed for this becuase you don't want deep tears that take more than a day off in between to heal from.

Dumbell press= chest& tries
Military press= Shoulder, tries, & a little chest
Bent over rows= back bi's & a little lat & hamstring
preacher curls= bi's
dips= tries, chest, & a little shoulder
abs= self explanatory
squats= quads, hams, calves,a little back & even your core. Most helpful exercise to the whole body, but also the one with the most risk. This exercise actually makes your body naturally produce more growth hormone and endorphins . I would recommend you do these with very little weight or with dumbbells in your hands instead of a bar on your shoulders. Since you aren't lifting for size you will get the benefits of squats without the negative health damages.
calf raises= I would also add something for you shins so you can work your opposite muscle group with it. Kickouts on a leg press machine work fine for that.

Anyway this looks good to me. As long as you aren't lifting heavy weights you should not be sore with the day of in between. If you are sore then it's to soon to lift that muscle again. A muscle is only ready to be fully tore down when it is fully healed again. Small dense muscle groups like calves , abs, and most especially your heart are fine with daily use. You still don't want to overwork them though. You use them all the time in the course of a normal day. If you want to add size, I would recommend a secondary muscles group workout so your muscles have time to fully heal before being tore again. You would also want to use heavier weights for deeper tears, need a spotter, and want to do force reps and negatives in that case.
Jackelope
3/31/08 6:22:27PM
Thanks for that insightful post smacker of the tree huggers.

I'm trying to build up some size and you pretty much voiced the unannounced concerns I had. I don't really have the time at the moment to split the muscle groups for deep tearing and good recovery time. All the articles on full body workouts I've read so far say they're just fine for building muscle, but I kept asking myself "how can that be the case when you only allow 1 day of rest?"

I'm going to try it out and really focus on my diet for these next few weeks. I can't picture myself sticking with it for too long, though. I just got back from the gym about 30 minutes ago and I've got to admit that I'm not "sore" but I feel "tired" It really drains your energy. I felt it mostly during the squats. I also changed the military presses to arnold presses.

Oh, and Rush- thanks a lot for the clarification. I really want to try out those kettle bells. Sounds like it's something way different than what I was thinking it was. I asked the gym owner today if he planned on ordering any and he said he's "old school" so I took that as a no. I'm not so naive to think that there's only one way to do things, so I really want to try them out

casey64
3/31/08 6:37:24PM

Posted by hippysmacker


Posted by Jackelope

Lately I've had some more commitments than usual, so I've been working out in the gym only 3 days a week compared to my usual 5. I have been doing it just like I used to do my workouts (push muscles, pull muscles, legs) but I've been curious about trying out a 3 days a week full body program.

Supposedly they're fun, less time consuming, and pretty productive. Anybody here ever done a 3 day full body workout?

I'm thinking of starting tomorrow with this-

Dumbbell press x 4 (sets)
Military press x 4
Bent over rows x 4
Preacher curls x 4
Dips x 4
Abs exercises x 4
Squats x 4
Calf raises x 4

Possibly adding in some pull ups in the middle there if I feel up to it. I'm not sure how much all of this will get me on the fatigue level. I plan on pushing with enough weight (probably 80% of 1RM) so that I'm struggling through the whole thing. I've been a gym rat for 10 years off and on, so I'd consider myself advanced level, but not exactly a "pro"

What are your thoughts on this program and the 3 day a week full body programs in general?



I used to be a personal trainer, so I will weigh in on this. The key to full body workouts or any total circuit is that it isn't really about building muscle mass. This will work , and yes I would I wold add a lat exercise to it, a pullup or lat pull down of some kind - if you have machines. Also , heavy weight is not needed for this becuase you don't want deep tears that take more than a day off in between to heal from.

Dumbell press= chest& tries
Military press= Shoulder, tries, & a little chest
Bent over rows= back bi's & a little lat & hamstring
preacher curls= bi's
dips= tries, chest, & a little shoulder
abs= self explanatory
squats= quads, hams, calves,a little back & even your core. Most helpful exercise to the whole body, but also the one with the most risk. This exercise actually makes your body naturally produce more growth hormone and endorphins . I would recommend you do these with very little weight or with dumbbells in your hands instead of a bar on your shoulders. Since you aren't lifting for size you will get the benefits of squats without the negative health damages.
calf raises= I would also add something for you shins so you can work your opposite muscle group with it. Kickouts on a leg press machine work fine for that.

Anyway this looks good to me. As long as you aren't lifting heavy weights you should not be sore with the day of in between. If you are sore then it's to soon to lift that muscle again. A muscle is only ready to be fully tore down when it is fully healed again. Small dense muscle groups like calves , abs, and most especially your heart are fine with daily use. You still don't want to overwork them though. You use them all the time in the course of a normal day. If you want to add size, I would recommend a secondary muscles group workout so your muscles have time to fully heal before being tore again. You would also want to use heavier weights for deeper tears, need a spotter, and want to do force reps and negatives in that case.





nice info on the squat
Rush
3/31/08 7:26:02PM

Posted by Jackelope

Oh, and Rush- thanks a lot for the clarification. I really want to try out those kettle bells. Sounds like it's something way different than what I was thinking it was. I asked the gym owner today if he planned on ordering any and he said he's "old school" so I took that as a no. I'm not so naive to think that there's only one way to do things, so I really want to try them out





No problem. If you are ever in the Toronto area, you can try mine out.
hotrodttt
4/1/08 1:42:33AM

Posted by Jackelope


Posted by hotrodttt

Me and my brother, before he went to Iraq did these Workouts called Burners that we got from doing Cross Fit. You only need to do tis 1 Time a week because You'll be sore for the rest.

100 Strait Pull Ups - Run 1/4 of a Mile
100 Strait Push Ups - Run 1/4 of a Mile
100 Strait Sit Ups not crunches - Run 1/4 of a Mile
100 Straight Air Squats - Run 1/4 of a Mile

So now you have been worked full body and Ran a Mile




The pull ups and the air squats might get me sore, but 100 push ups and 100 sit ups isn't going to do jack for me at this point. Before I left the Army I was doing 112 push ups in 2 minutes and 103 situps. Only reason I couldn't do more in those 2 minutes (each exercise) is because time ran out. How do you even do 100 straight pull ups? I can bust out around 24 pull ups (undergrip) a set. Not sure even if I split it into 5 different sets if I could get to 100, though.

Besides, right now I've got a gym membership and I like using the weights, haha.




I do sets of 20 when I do the Pull Ups because who can do 100 straight Pull Ups , I mean my brother might go to the Olympics in Beijing and he can get into the 60's/70's Range.
Jackelope
4/1/08 9:31:20AM
Haha okay yeah I was thinking "damn 100 straight pull ups?!?!"

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