I use my bare hands when punching the heavy bag is that a problem?

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chrismithers
7/23/08 11:30:42PM
I have just been wondering cause for the first time ever my two middle knuckels skin ripped open is that bad at all or she i keep doing what im doing?
HMA123
7/23/08 11:38:21PM
Cut and Paste...

I going to guess that you have access to a punching bag and youre goofing around. Judging by the nature of your question. It is important to wrap your hands. The best way to answer your own question is to take a look at those who earn a living at fighting. I mean if you want to build a house would you use a rock to hammer nails. Probably not, Your smart enough to know that guys doing construction use a hammer.
Here is the problem with not wrapping up. First of all you aren’t hitting a stable object and it is not a flat surface. And when punching your wrist is in a locked position so the energy is transferred to your opponent or bag etc. After a while you will start throwing a bit harder and increase the likelihood of your wrist giving way. (Trust me i've seen it happen)

Second, each time you hit the bag your hand will conform to the bag and spread out. Slowly deforming your hand. And the what’s going on is that your stretching and tweaking all the muscles, tendons and ligaments that give your hand/fist its rigidity. Over time your hand will be more likely to be injury prone and brittle. And last but not least well on you way to arthritis. And if your hands hurt after a session of hitting the bag. That is a sign of your hands deteriorating. To put it simply, the hand is not designed to punch, its designed to grasp.

Lastly, I recommend gloves. Wraps are imperative but as I mentioned your hands conform to the shape of the bag with each punch. Gloves will absorb some of the force and do the conforming instead of your hands. Some on here implied it toughens up your knuckles. That’s all well and fine but unless you plan on breaking boards there realyl isn’t any reason to worry about that. And if that is what you want to accompolish there are plenty of techniques you can implement to achieve that. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. I recommend you spend a few bucks now on wraps and or gloves now than spend a small fortune on medication and doctors bills when you get older and have limited use of your hands later in life.
Jackelope
7/24/08 1:09:51AM

Posted by HMA123

I going to guess that you have access to a punching bag and youre goofing around. Judging by the nature of your question. It is important to wrap your hands. The best way to answer your own question is to take a look at those who earn a living at fighting. I mean if you want to build a house would you use a rock to hammer nails. Probably not, Your smart enough to know that guys doing construction use a hammer.
Here is the problem with not wrapping up. First of all you aren’t hitting a stable object and it is not a flat surface. And when punching your wrist is in a locked position so the energy is transferred to your opponent or bag etc. After a while you will start throwing a bit harder and increase the likelihood of your wrist giving way. (Trust me i've seen it happen)

Second, each time you hit the bag your hand will conform to the bag and spread out. Slowly deforming your hand. And the what’s going on is that your stretching and tweaking all the muscles, tendons and ligaments that give your hand/fist its rigidity. Over time your hand will be more likely to be injury prone and brittle. And last but not least well on you way to arthritis. And if your hands hurt after a session of hitting the bag. That is a sign of your hands deteriorating. To put it simply, the hand is not designed to punch, its designed to grasp.

Lastly, I recommend gloves. Wraps are imperative but as I mentioned your hands conform to the shape of the bag with each punch. Gloves will absorb some of the force and do the conforming instead of your hands. Some on here implied it toughens up your knuckles. That’s all well and fine but unless you plan on breaking boards there realyl isn’t any reason to worry about that. And if that is what you want to accompolish there are plenty of techniques you can implement to achieve that. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. I recommend you spend a few bucks now on wraps and or gloves now than spend a small fortune on medication and doctors bills when you get older and have limited use of your hands later in life.



Dude I used to have respect for you, but as you keep copy-pasting stuff from Yahoo! Answers and other websites then claiming them as your own my respect for you continues to dwindle.

To the TS- The advice written above isn't bad (even though it was written by someone other than the one who would claim to have written it) Get some hand wraps and boxing gloves. You don't want to F up your wrists and hands.
DiabloFreak56
7/24/08 1:21:14AM
you can hurt your hand by doing that
ufcboss
7/24/08 4:08:06AM
Dude, This is a MMA website, Who cares (But you) If he cuts and pastes, He answer the question, So why complain??? Picky people on here!

Heres someting I wrote for you,

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Svartorm
7/24/08 4:22:01AM
I'm from a different background than most folks, coming from TMA, so I have a different outlook on this. For one thing, rolling your wrist hurts, but if you START working a bag with gloves and wraps, it doesn't help condition the wrist. That means you'll be prone to rolling it if you ever hit someone without wraps on. I'm not sure if you're just goofing around, want to train MMA, or are doing this for self-defense training, but you want you wrist to be able to withstand rolling without the aid of supports. There are three good ways to do this:

1. Doing knucke push-ups, where you do pushups on your fists instead of the flat of your hand will build wrist strength over time.

2. Buy a kettlebell and a book on how to use it. Kettlebells are one of the best functional strength tools ever and build wrist and grip strength like crazy.

3. SLOWLY work your heavy bag without gloves or wraps. By slowly, I don't mean throw combos and dance around it like you would while going all out, but take up a solid stance and try to throw perfect form punches. If you're doing it right, your wrist wont roll. Obviously you need to know how to throw a punch correctly to do this, so if you don't, lessons of some sort are definitely in order.

What wraps are really for is to keep you from breaking your hand, as when you learn to punch hard, the bones in your hand can't withstand the impact and will want to splay out, and the wraps prevent this to a degree. Gloves are good for wrist support and suppliment your work out, i.e Your arms get tired faster with heavier gloves.
Rush
7/24/08 9:25:58AM

Posted by ufcboss

Dude, This is a MMA website, Who cares (But you) If he cuts and pastes, He answer the question, So why complain??? Picky people on here!




Because.... click me
Jackelope
7/24/08 9:47:58AM

Posted by Svartorm

I'm from a different background than most folks, coming from TMA, so I have a different outlook on this. For one thing, rolling your wrist hurts, but if you START working a bag with gloves and wraps, it doesn't help condition the wrist. That means you'll be prone to rolling it if you ever hit someone without wraps on. I'm not sure if you're just goofing around, want to train MMA, or are doing this for self-defense training, but you want you wrist to be able to withstand rolling without the aid of supports. There are three good ways to do this:

1. Doing knucke push-ups, where you do pushups on your fists instead of the flat of your hand will build wrist strength over time.

2. Buy a kettlebell and a book on how to use it. Kettlebells are one of the best functional strength tools ever and build wrist and grip strength like crazy.

3. SLOWLY work your heavy bag without gloves or wraps. By slowly, I don't mean throw combos and dance around it like you would while going all out, but take up a solid stance and try to throw perfect form punches. If you're doing it right, your wrist wont roll. Obviously you need to know how to throw a punch correctly to do this, so if you don't, lessons of some sort are definitely in order.

What wraps are really for is to keep you from breaking your hand, as when you learn to punch hard, the bones in your hand can't withstand the impact and will want to splay out, and the wraps prevent this to a degree. Gloves are good for wrist support and suppliment your work out, i.e Your arms get tired faster with heavier gloves.



The toughening of the knuckles and hands are important, IMO. So there are some good points in here. My only concern if this advice is to be followed is whether or not he has a good teacher who's shown him how to properly throw a punch? If he's turning his fist at the end of his punches and bringing them out in a truly linear fashion his wrist should be in line, but if he's just throwing on a bag at home he's likely to be taking himself down a road he doesn't want to see what's at the end of. For safety's sake and based on the format of the original question I would assume he doesn't have a formal trainer to ask this question of.

Back in the day I used to throw bare knuckle all day long. Around the house I had set up kung fu style punching pads filled with rice, beans and sand up against studs in the walls or on the concrete wall outside. My knuckles got hard as hell doing so, and it really helped my punching power. Problem was that I got to a point where I was over training them. I never had a doctor check it out, but something started happening to my middle knuckle on my right hand (power hand) It swelled up ridiculous and it made it hurt to close my fist. To this day my right middle knuckle is about 1 1/2 times the size of my left middle knuckle and my right pinky doesn't stay in line when I close my fist. I don't know if I broke my hand or what (It didn't hurt that bad) but I definitely screwed something up. Thank God I never hurt my wrist, but at the time I was undertrained (6 months of Wing Chun and about a year and a half of Kenpo Karate at the time- I was 19)

So that's why I speak a cautionary tale in regards to this issue. Like I said, though... toughening the hands and knuckles is important for self defense. You just gotta be careful
Mastodon2
7/24/08 2:10:08PM
Traditional Karate practicioners punch with bare knuckles against tensioned wooden posts (called a "Makiwara"), but they start with weakly tensioned ones and work up to really tight ones as their knuckles harden and their wrists become stronger. However, as after training in Muay Thai, I've never had to use a Makiwara, my wrists are pretty strong from heavy bagging with gloves and wraps. Perhaps not as strong as say Svartorm's, but then I stay out of situations where I'd have to hit someone without gloves anyway. The only time I never need to hit someone, I've already got gloves on. If you don't have proper supervision (and I'm guessing you don't, as noone at your gym has yet tried to stop you from punching bare hand) then don't punch without gloves and wraps. And it goes without saying, learn to tie your wraps on properly.

Svartorm
7/24/08 9:27:44PM

Posted by ufcboss

Dude, This is a MMA website, Who cares (But you) If he cuts and pastes, He answer the question, So why complain??? Picky people on here!



Because if he doesn't know enough about combatives to write something himself, he doesn't know if the info hes giving out is even accurate or useful. We want this to be a useful resource for people training, and posting potentially poor advice doesn't help us towards that end.
Svartorm
7/24/08 9:34:34PM

Posted by Jackelope

Back in the day I used to throw bare knuckle all day long. Around the house I had set up kung fu style punching pads filled with rice, beans and sand up against studs in the walls or on the concrete wall outside. My knuckles got hard as hell doing so, and it really helped my punching power. Problem was that I got to a point where I was over training them. I never had a doctor check it out, but something started happening to my middle knuckle on my right hand (power hand) It swelled up ridiculous and it made it hurt to close my fist. To this day my right middle knuckle is about 1 1/2 times the size of my left middle knuckle and my right pinky doesn't stay in line when I close my fist. I don't know if I broke my hand or what (It didn't hurt that bad) but I definitely screwed something up. Thank God I never hurt my wrist, but at the time I was undertrained (6 months of Wing Chun and about a year and a half of Kenpo Karate at the time- I was 19)



I've never been a fan of striking super hard objects with the fists either. Granted, a heavy bag is fairly hard, which is why I said to make sure your form is perfect and to slowly punch the bag to develop the hand strength.

On a side note, if you're doing this and the bag is hurting your hand, you can take out some of the filling in your bag. Just put it in a trashbag and take out enough so the bag has a bit more give to it. Over time, you can just add the stuffing back in.
chris91301
7/25/08 1:22:06PM
dont do barehand on heavy bags, you do run a risk of hurting your wrist and you will end up damaging your hands long term, at older age can cause incredibly major pain. (this is what I was told by several trainers when I was younger and tried punching a bag without gloves).

gentlemen whats with the arguing? the man posted a valid point regarding bag punching. doesnt matter if its from yahoo. thats very childish to argue about that on an mma forum.
The-Don
7/25/08 5:00:16PM
i agree wrapping is very important... espically on heavy bags and the like.. the makiwaras (sp?) board mentioned above does have some give if it is made right and your are not doing hooking shots and everything with it as it is not designed for that.. you could get away using bare knuckle with out as much damage to the wrists...


as for the cut and paste.. both sides have valid points... Does a person who promarally cuts and pastes actually have the knowledge and are just lazy.. or are they just searching for an answer then putting it up... granted in this case the info is coming for a smoewhat reliable source that some blog or something somewhere but that may not always be the case.. this section of the forum is set up in a way were you are able to engage the "experts" not just read someone someone copied elsewhere.... there are several of us on here who mave many years of martial arts training and combat sports partici9pation experience... tthere are some threads pinned at the top where you can broswe through and see what some of the people have claimed... granted it is hard for anyone on here to verify who has actually done what... but take myself for instance... I have pretty good knowledge on physical training and grappling... so your rarely going to see me give out advice on striking unless it is in general like the benifits of wrapping hands and such granted I have been training in martial arts now for 20+ years in various styles... I probably know more then I do about stand up but am just not overly comfortable with it.. so I have a tendency to not gi ve out much advice in the stand up... but thats just me...
AO
7/29/08 1:24:51PM

Posted by Svartorm

I'm from a different background than most folks, coming from TMA, so I have a different outlook on this. For one thing, rolling your wrist hurts, but if you START working a bag with gloves and wraps, it doesn't help condition the wrist. That means you'll be prone to rolling it if you ever hit someone without wraps on. I'm not sure if you're just goofing around, want to train MMA, or are doing this for self-defense training, but you want you wrist to be able to withstand rolling without the aid of supports. There are three good ways to do this:

1. Doing knucke push-ups, where you do pushups on your fists instead of the flat of your hand will build wrist strength over time.

2. Buy a kettlebell and a book on how to use it. Kettlebells are one of the best functional strength tools ever and build wrist and grip strength like crazy.

3. SLOWLY work your heavy bag without gloves or wraps. By slowly, I don't mean throw combos and dance around it like you would while going all out, but take up a solid stance and try to throw perfect form punches. If you're doing it right, your wrist wont roll. Obviously you need to know how to throw a punch correctly to do this, so if you don't, lessons of some sort are definitely in order.

What wraps are really for is to keep you from breaking your hand, as when you learn to punch hard, the bones in your hand can't withstand the impact and will want to splay out, and the wraps prevent this to a degree. Gloves are good for wrist support and suppliment your work out, i.e Your arms get tired faster with heavier gloves.




you are far more likely to get reoccurring stress injuries than you are to toughen your hands or wrists. all these people and there's not one kinesiologist on this board?

if you were training for mma the hand speed gained from bag work with wrapped hands and 16oz (or heavier) gloves would be a greater advantage than "toughened" wrists or hands. the only reason I would even consider not using them would be if I was training for a bareknuckle/ vale tudo contest of some sort.

AO
7/29/08 1:26:37PM

Posted by chris91301

dont do barehand on heavy bags, you do run a risk of hurting your wrist and you will end up damaging your hands long term, at older age can cause incredibly major pain. (this is what I was told by several trainers when I was younger and tried punching a bag without gloves).

gentlemen whats with the arguing? the man posted a valid point regarding bag punching. doesnt matter if its from yahoo. thats very childish to argue about that on an mma forum.



i dont think its childish at all. it goes to show the validity of the advise being posted.

at the very least he should have posted the exact link with the information. someone might take that information as gospel and end up getting hurt.
fullerene
7/29/08 3:15:52PM
This is a good debate. My thoughts:
* *Most trainers recommend hitting pads and bags with sparring (16 oz) boxing gloves, not with bare hands or with MMA (4 oz) gloves or bare hands...take a look at TUF and show me any time where this isn't the case.
* The idea of using the heavier gloves (even HW boxers would only use 12 oz gloves) isn't to make punches go faster (see the thread on "Hand Speed" in this forum for a discussion on that topic) it's to allow you to punch as hard as you want without thinking about the consequences of hand and/or wrist injuries.
* Similar to Svartom I hit the bag enough barehanded when I was younger that I never had to worry about wrist injuries or bruised knuckles later, but I think that might be a matter of attrition and it still leaves you open to possible nerve damage over time; When I punch bare handed I can't hit as hard or as freely as I do with gloves on which effects my rhythm and punch selection (no uppercuts into a hard bag for example). I now prefer to do this only when I'm trying to incorporate knees (and grabbing the bag with my hands) and to do so with light contact on my punches.
mrsmiley
7/29/08 7:12:47PM
When I first bought a punching bag (around 2002),starting out,I used nothing but my bare first.I thought it would be "cool" to toughen up my first and be able to hit it freely without gloves.

Around 5 years later I can say it probably wasn't the smartest idea.I can just about hit the bag as hard with my bare hands as I can with boxing gloves,though I rarely do,afraid I might injure my wrist. (the bag is 80lbs),but I believe I might have suffered some damage from it.
I can't pin point it on the heavy bag 100% though.It might be from playing in smokey bars every weekend,or the simple fact I was playing music non stop in bands for 5 years straight and not warming my finters up properly.Or perhaps a mixture of both.But some mornings I wake up with pain in my hands and wrist.My fingers sometimes feel out of place (perhaps carpel tunnel) spell check.

The best thing I can say about using your bare hands though,is that you can get some bragging rights when your friends hit the bag full force with their bare hands,then scream out in pain shaking their fist and wondering what they did wrong.Then you hit it with all your body and just look at them and laugh.
That's my 2 cents on the subject.I'm not expert,but I hope this helps.
Svartorm
7/29/08 10:44:05PM
I should probably clarify a few things on my stand point on this:

1. While I teach sub grappling and fight amatuer NHB, my main focus is self-defense instruction and training, so I don't usually even DO bagwork except maybe once a week, unless I'm training for a fight, and then its three times a week.

2. My typical bagwork when not training is with bag gloves, and its a short session. I just like to keep my basic combos crisp and make sure my power is still there. When training I start with 12oz gloves and work my endurance, then take them off and work with MMA gloves on my technique and combos.

3. I own a 100lb heavy bag, and before that I used my brothers 60lb heavy bag. I've been doing karate since I was 9, and 17 years later, have no problems with my hands. I think the hand problems come from two things. 1) Training TOO MUCH with bare hands on a heavy bag. 2) Not taking time off to allow your hands to heal if you somehow hurt them.
AO
7/30/08 7:41:51AM

Posted by fullerene

This is a good debate. My thoughts:
* *Most trainers recommend hitting pads and bags with sparring (16 oz) boxing gloves, not with bare hands or with MMA (4 oz) gloves or bare hands...take a look at TUF and show me any time where this isn't the case.
* The idea of using the heavier gloves (even HW boxers would only use 12 oz gloves) isn't to make punches go faster (see the thread on "Hand Speed" in this forum for a discussion on that topic) it's to allow you to punch as hard as you want without thinking about the consequences of hand and/or wrist injuries.
* Similar to Svartom I hit the bag enough barehanded when I was younger that I never had to worry about wrist injuries or bruised knuckles later, but I think that might be a matter of attrition and it still leaves you open to possible nerve damage over time; When I punch bare handed I can't hit as hard or as freely as I do with gloves on which effects my rhythm and punch selection (no uppercuts into a hard bag for example). I now prefer to do this only when I'm trying to incorporate knees (and grabbing the bag with my hands) and to do so with light contact on my punches.



Using heavier and weighted gloves does increase hand speed. It has been proven. Not sure where the information in that thread is coming from i'll have to look.

If there was anyone with sports medicine knowledge in here they could easily rectify the toughening of hands/wrists debate. while hands are somewhat designed for significant impact, wrists are not. punching without support means your wrists are absorbing a good portion of that force which causes damage, plain and simple.

fullerene
7/30/08 8:49:38AM

Posted by AO
Using heavier and weighted gloves does increase hand speed. It has been proven. Not sure where the information in that thread is coming from i'll have to look.


I think you're confusing muscular endurance and power training with speed training, but I'm willing to look at your source which I assume you have since it's "been proven".

I like your posts from another site AO so welcome and don't take my skepticisim the wrong way. I just find that in combat sports training a lot of things have been claimed and very little has actually been established as fact. That's why talking to other people who actually train/fight and sifting through a variety of opinions is still often the best (and only) way to answer questions like the one in this thread. I tend to weigh empirical evidence (what I've seen other trainers and fighters do) more than scientific theory (what sports medicine and some TMA theories say should be possible, when it contradicts the way people actually train or react in fights).
AO
7/30/08 9:08:57AM

Posted by fullerene


Posted by AO
Using heavier and weighted gloves does increase hand speed. It has been proven. Not sure where the information in that thread is coming from i'll have to look.


I think you're confusing muscular endurance and power training with speed training, but I'm willing to look at your source which I assume you have since it's "been proven".

I like your posts from another site AO so welcome and don't take my skepticisim the wrong way. I just find that in combat sports training a lot of things have been claimed and very little has actually been established as fact. That's why talking to other people who actually train/fight and sifting through a variety of opinions is still often the best (and only) way to answer questions like the one in this thread. I tend to weigh empirical evidence (what I've seen other trainers and fighters do) more than scientific theory (what sports medicine and some TMA theories say should be possible, when it contradicts the way people actually train or react in fights).



Fair enough. Although good sports medicine is developed primarily from empirical data and not theory. I do high level statistical analysis as a profession so I fall in to the same category.

I have noticed increased hand speed in my own punching from using 20oz weighted gloves. It's been over a year since i've done bag work, but I will use a radar gun and try to get actual data to verify my claims first hand. I'll try and get a few other people to oblige as well.

Jackelope
7/30/08 10:24:44AM

Posted by AO


Posted by fullerene


Posted by AO
Using heavier and weighted gloves does increase hand speed. It has been proven. Not sure where the information in that thread is coming from i'll have to look.


I think you're confusing muscular endurance and power training with speed training, but I'm willing to look at your source which I assume you have since it's "been proven".

I like your posts from another site AO so welcome and don't take my skepticisim the wrong way. I just find that in combat sports training a lot of things have been claimed and very little has actually been established as fact. That's why talking to other people who actually train/fight and sifting through a variety of opinions is still often the best (and only) way to answer questions like the one in this thread. I tend to weigh empirical evidence (what I've seen other trainers and fighters do) more than scientific theory (what sports medicine and some TMA theories say should be possible, when it contradicts the way people actually train or react in fights).



Fair enough. Although good sports medicine is developed primarily from empirical data and not theory. I do high level statistical analysis as a profession so I fall in to the same category.

I have noticed increased hand speed in my own punching from using 20oz weighted gloves. It's been over a year since i've done bag work, but I will use a radar gun and try to get actual data to verify my claims first hand. I'll try and get a few other people to oblige as well.




Sounds GREAT! I can't wait to see the results.

As for me personally I've always trained hand speed with focus mitts and shadowboxing. No weights. I've also done quite a few of the Bruce Lee methods for hand speed like punching a piece of paper hanging from a string and punching out a candle.
Rush
8/5/08 8:13:13PM

Posted by Svartorm

2. Buy a kettlebell and a book on how to use it. Kettlebells are one of the best functional strength tools ever and build wrist and grip strength like crazy.





Svar

Did you really find that your grip improved with kettlebell swings? Honestly, I haven't found that to be the case. I'm not sure if my grip strength has improved, but grip endurance seems to be the limiting factor.

For example, in my ab workout I do hanging leg tucks. I basically do them until my grip fails. I have found that that I can't really do any more reps now than I could prior to using the kettlebell.

I'm not sure about my wrist strength though.
Svartorm
8/6/08 12:26:10AM
What company did you get your kettlebell from? Some companys make them with smaller handles, which doesn't seem to help grip strength. I have one with a very fat handle and it definitely improves grip strength and grip endurance. It also depends on how much you use it too I'd imagine and what lifts you're doing. I do almost entirely swings with it, sometimes up to 600 a day and that definitely helps the wrists, forearm and grip.
Mastodon2
8/6/08 4:28:16AM

Posted by AO
Using heavier and weighted gloves does increase hand speed. It has been proven. Not sure where the information in that thread is coming from i'll have to look.



I have noticed increased hand speed in my own punching from using 20oz weighted gloves. It's been over a year since i've done bag work, but I will use a radar gun and try to get actual data to verify my claims first hand. I'll try and get a few other people to oblige as well.




Well, a lot of people believe that punching with really heavy gloves or wrist weights are bad for you, because they throw your form off. I have never heard of any top boxers or K-1 stars using super heavy gloves to to improve their hand speed, but there is one method they all use; focus mitts.

Also, wrist weights and/or super heavy gloves don't lend themselves much to wrist and forearm strengthening, because they stress the wrist and just cause strain on the joints and ligaments. Just my 2 cents, but I believe they don't help and do more harm than good.
Rush
8/7/08 12:02:42PM

Posted by Svartorm

What company did you get your kettlebell from? Some companys make them with smaller handles, which doesn't seem to help grip strength. I have one with a very fat handle and it definitely improves grip strength and grip endurance. It also depends on how much you use it too I'd imagine and what lifts you're doing. I do almost entirely swings with it, sometimes up to 600 a day and that definitely helps the wrists, forearm and grip.




I bought it from a private dealer, but it is called "Extreme kettlebell" and the handle is 1 1/4" in diameter (for my 24 kg one)

As for frequency. I don't use them more than twice a week. I do a variety different swings, snatches, etc (my routine is posted in another thread). However, I don't try and push my grip endurance too much because I don't want my kettlebell to slip out of my hands, especially when they get sweaty.
Svartorm
8/7/08 2:42:42PM
Ok, I just measured mine and its 1 5/8". Doesn't sound like much, but you can definitely feel the difference, especially when the grip is failing. Some guys actually put soap on the handles of their kettlebells to make them more slippery and harder to hold to increase grip strength, which I've never tried.
Rush
8/7/08 3:26:19PM
Wow, and I thought mine had a pretty thick handle. Not sure if I want to make the more slippery. lol I'm sure it's a debate for another thread, but the feeling I get when my kettlebell is all slippery is not the same as when I grip is failing. When my grip fails I get a burn in my forearm (which is understandable), followed by the urge to want to open my hand. However, when my kettlebell is all slippery, I don't get that feeling, yet it feels like if I grip too tight or too loose it will slip out of my hands. Not sure if that makes sense, but I guess it's like grabbing a fish. Sometimes a harder grip makes it slip more. AS I said, another debate for another thread. lol

Thanks for taking the time to check.
The-Don
8/7/08 3:32:38PM
I've been thinking of kettle bells for myself I have read alot of great things about them.. but even the threads on here the info on the different types of exercises is kinda vauge... where can one learn to use them properly?
Rush
8/7/08 3:38:00PM

Posted by The-Don

I've been thinking of kettle bells for myself I have read alot of great things about them.. but even the threads on here the info on the different types of exercises is kinda vauge... where can one learn to use them properly?



Get an instructional DVD by Pawel. That is probably the best thing short of actually getting a certified kettlebell instructor. There is not too much of a learning curve, but you can hurt yourself with poor technique.

I wouldn't recommend a book. There is something to be said about watching the whole movement.
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