Anderson Silva's MMA striking book

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CHH
12/6/08 6:19:48PM
I just wanted to say I'm new to this forum, cool place. Thanks everyone for welcoming me. I wanted to share my review of Anderson Silva's new book with you guys, MMA Striking. It's one of the latest releases from Victory Belt publishing. Firstly I want to say this is one of the better striking instructional manuals I've seen. I've never seen any book break down angles, concepts, and strategies like this book. First thing the book stresses is the importance of learning to strike from both stances, because whether you're fighting opposite stance or same stance really determines your angles, your strategies, and in general what techniques you can execute. Secondly it stresses the difference between a high and a low stance, and how the degrees of separation between the two stances will determine what techniques you can execute more easily than others. The third thing this book stresses is good foot/head movement. All the footwork and body movement (slips, bob/weave, ect) sections are very simply displayed, and any subtle movements are made more clear with graphical arrows to demonstrate the movements. And as mentioned before, the importance is stressed between inside movement and outside movement, as well as proper movement during same stance fighting and opposite stance.

The first few chapters of techniques are all movement and defensive based. Checks, parries, slips, foot work, blocking with high guard, and circling out are all covered in thorough detail. The next few chapters cover all of Anderson's striking techniques. These chapters focus on the base technique it's self (without combos or counters). The pictures show in multiple angles with and without opponent, to show the accurate way to execute these techniques. The attacks cover the entire range of strikes you'll see from Anderson Silva, or anyone else for that matter. Everything from inside cut kicks to spinning rear elbows are covered. There's a chapter for punches, elbows, kicks, and knees covering each in heavy detail.

The final few chapters are meat and potatoes of the book in my opinion, and it's also what other books I've seen haven't covered. The sections are broken down in attacks and counter attacks. And each set of attacks and combos are broken down by same stance (say orthodox on orthodox) and opposite stance (say orthodox to southpaw). The same with the counterattacks. If you've never really sat down and analyzed the difference between the two situations, you will likely be amazed by this section. Anderson really covers all the scenarios between each different circumstance. The counter-attacks section is the same. There are huge differences between how you slip a punch and counter a southpaw and an orthodox.

This book really is a great buy. There are highlighted 'technical tips' scattered throughout which will give you some of the finer points on everything from proper parrying between the two stances to advantageous footwork you can use against opposite stance fighters to get the angle on your punches. The book is organized very well, and the pictures are as crisp as I've seen in any other book. Any independent movement that isn't immediately obvious by the progression of pictures is neatly spelled out by arrows or center lines showing movement between photos. Whether you need to sharpen your striking abilities, or simply want to learn why Anderson threw a reverse back elbow against Fryklund, you should pick up this book.

AnDeRsonDaSiLvA
12/6/08 6:32:07PM
where do i buy it?
aaa9erh8er
12/6/08 7:51:45PM
Barnes and Nobel has it
bjj1605
12/7/08 3:56:53AM
I must have it!! I love instructional books I have all the gracie books, a bj penn book, some muay thai books, eddie bravo's books, and a couple others. This would be a good addition.
GrizzlyChadams
12/7/08 7:26:39PM
I don't train MMA at all, just curious how much someone can actually pick up from books? Seems like it would be a bit difficult to pick something like MMA up from a book.
warglory
12/7/08 10:46:23PM

Posted by GrizzlyChadams

I don't train MMA at all, just curious how much someone can actually pick up from books? Seems like it would be a bit difficult to pick something like MMA up from a book.



I have wondered the same thing.
JimiMak
12/7/08 11:16:58PM

Posted by GrizzlyChadams

I don't train MMA at all, just curious how much someone can actually pick up from books? Seems like it would be a bit difficult to pick something like MMA up from a book.



I don't think anyone is trying to "learn mma from a book". But many of us on here train anywhere from occasionally to the guys that are trying to be mma stars.

I do think that most American males have at least some fighting experience. This sounds like the kind of thing you can take pointers from if you have a good idea of how to fight. I've got a lot of experience fighting (when I was younger) but I've always been much more confident in my ability to bring things to the ground. I'm interested in something that can at least get concepts in my head better. Also if I get into MT soon like I hope to it could really help.

I've never bought a book on fighting before, but this sounds like something I might check out.

Thanks to the TS as I didn't know this even came out.
4u2nv
12/8/08 9:06:00AM
wow never knew this book was existed! nice find and thanks for the write up. sounds like a great stocking stuffer for me! lol
wiggum
12/8/08 10:10:45AM

Posted by warglory


Posted by GrizzlyChadams

I don't train MMA at all, just curious how much someone can actually pick up from books? Seems like it would be a bit difficult to pick something like MMA up from a book.



I have wondered the same thing.



the thing to remeber about instructionals, is that they should be looked at as adding skills to an already existing game.....i personally love books cuz you can bring new techniques to your gym to test out and learn, espcially since everybody has theyre on little twist on how things should be done.....basically i view instructionals as supplements, not a method of learning how to fight, and for people that dont have the ability to gym hop to learn techniques then i think its important to invest in some various instructionals...thats if yer taking yer classes seriously and want to learn as much as possible to expand your game
GrizzlyChadams
12/8/08 12:53:52PM
I'd be more interested in maybe downloading some instructional videos or something along those lines. Any suggestions?
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