I've had some striking problems.

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seanfu
4/30/08 5:38:08PM
So I have 3 major problems with my striking.

1- I have a pretty weak chin. I know there are two points on the head- temple/high, and the jaw. When I'm hit on the temple I'm never anywhere near being phased.

When I get hit on the chin I get rocked pretty easily. I don't fall or get knocked off balance but I get headaches like a bitch. I'm not sure what to do about it that can help.
I'm a very inexperianced striker.(haven't been hit a lot)


2- I hit very hard and can crumble someone with a set bodyshot, but when I aim high with my fists I have no real power. Almost all I'll throw high are straights and overhands. My hooks have no power.

3- are you supposed to strike with the instep? I strike with my shin but have no length on my legs so headkicks and ranged kicks happen on the very bottom of my shin above the foot in the instep area.

My instep area will swell up but I'm not training for another month so I need to know while I'm busy refining my new stuff. I learned a bunch of Muay Thai skills while I was post wrestling season and I don't have anyone to ask all this to.

If nothing else I'd like to know about the chin because I have a fight in about 2 weeks.
Jackelope
4/30/08 6:06:14PM
Keep your chin tucked, and remember when you throw your punches to help cover it up as much as possible with that shoulder. For example- if you throw a right straight you want your chin to be tucked below your right shoulder. Just make sure you're staying relaxed while doing so, because real power comes from relaxation. This is something that takes years and years to fine tune. You're not going to be there just yet.

Of course keep your neck strength up, but being a wrestler I'd imagine your neck is already pretty strong. Keep doing your bridges and if you've got a neck machine in your gym use that, too.

You're not supposed to strike with the instep of your foot since the small muscles and bones in your foot aren't built to handle all of that pressure. You should be hitting with your shin, of course. I'd say at this point it sounds like your flexibility may not allow you to strike to the head with your shins. So, just don't strike to the head with your shins. Guys like Jardine make their money kicks to the body and legs. My old instructor used to tell me "for every inch of head, there's a foot of body.. use it!" Go figure that my old instructor came from the same school as Greg Jackson's kickboxing instructor.

I'd imagine as a wrestler you don't like going high with kicks anyway, since it feels like it steals from your base. That's something most wrestlers are never comfortable with. (myself included)

Hooks are the most difficult punch to correctly throw, IMO. First of all the technique of throwing one takes a long, long time to perfect (really, any technique takes a long, long time) . Just remember that punches start at the feet, then travel up through the legs, gain even more energy from the hips, and then finally follow through at the fist. When I throw hooks I like to picture myself as a coil bound up and releasing all of its energy, then winding right back up again. I come from more linear styles, so the hook isn't something I'm the most proficient at, but it works for me. I'm sure some american boxing or possibly guys with a bit more muay thai skills could elaborate more on the hook. Another thing I would like to add about hooks is to make sure the foot opposite of the throwing hand (I.E. left foot if throwing right hook) doesn't plant flat and steal the power from the punch.
owen1
4/30/08 6:33:56PM

Posted by Jackelope

Keep your chin tucked, and remember when you throw your punches to help cover it up as much as possible with that shoulder. For example- if you throw a right straight you want your chin to be tucked below your right shoulder. Just make sure you're staying relaxed while doing so, because real power comes from relaxation. This is something that takes years and years to fine tune. You're not going to be there just yet.

Of course keep your neck strength up, but being a wrestler I'd imagine your neck is already pretty strong. Keep doing your bridges and if you've got a neck machine in your gym use that, too.

You're not supposed to strike with the instep of your foot since the small muscles in your foot aren't built to handle all of that pressure. You should be hitting with your shin, of course. I'd say at this point it sounds like your flexibility may not allow you to strike to the head with your shins. So, just don't strike to the head with your shins. Guys like Jardine make their money kicks to the body and legs. My old instructor used to tell me "for every inch of head, there's a foot of body.. use it!" Go figure that my old instructor came from the same school as Greg Jackson's kickboxing instructor.

I'd imagine as a wrestler you don't like going high with kicks anyway, since it feels like it steals from your base. That's something most wrestlers are never comfortable with. (myself included)

Hooks are the most difficult punch to correctly throw, IMO. First of all the technique of throwing one takes a long, long time to perfect (really, any technique takes a long, long time) . Just remember that punches start at the feet, then travel up through the legs, gain even more energy from the hips, and then finally follow through at the fist. When I throw hooks I like to picture myself as a coil bound up and releasing all of its energy, then winding right back up again. I come from more linear styles, so the hook isn't something I'm the most proficient at, but it works for me. I'm sure some american boxing or possibly guys with a bit more muay thai skills could elaborate more on the hook. Another thing I would like to add about hooks is to make sure the foot opposite of the throwing hand (I.E. left foot if throwing right hook) doesn't plant flat and steal the power from the punch.



Thats some solid advice there.
That definately deserves some props
The_Ho_Bag
4/30/08 8:22:31PM

Posted by owen1


Posted by Jackelope

Keep your chin tucked, and remember when you throw your punches to help cover it up as much as possible with that shoulder. For example- if you throw a right straight you want your chin to be tucked below your right shoulder. Just make sure you're staying relaxed while doing so, because real power comes from relaxation. This is something that takes years and years to fine tune. You're not going to be there just yet.

Of course keep your neck strength up, but being a wrestler I'd imagine your neck is already pretty strong. Keep doing your bridges and if you've got a neck machine in your gym use that, too.

You're not supposed to strike with the instep of your foot since the small muscles in your foot aren't built to handle all of that pressure. You should be hitting with your shin, of course. I'd say at this point it sounds like your flexibility may not allow you to strike to the head with your shins. So, just don't strike to the head with your shins. Guys like Jardine make their money kicks to the body and legs. My old instructor used to tell me "for every inch of head, there's a foot of body.. use it!" Go figure that my old instructor came from the same school as Greg Jackson's kickboxing instructor.

I'd imagine as a wrestler you don't like going high with kicks anyway, since it feels like it steals from your base. That's something most wrestlers are never comfortable with. (myself included)

Hooks are the most difficult punch to correctly throw, IMO. First of all the technique of throwing one takes a long, long time to perfect (really, any technique takes a long, long time) . Just remember that punches start at the feet, then travel up through the legs, gain even more energy from the hips, and then finally follow through at the fist. When I throw hooks I like to picture myself as a coil bound up and releasing all of its energy, then winding right back up again. I come from more linear styles, so the hook isn't something I'm the most proficient at, but it works for me. I'm sure some american boxing or possibly guys with a bit more muay thai skills could elaborate more on the hook. Another thing I would like to add about hooks is to make sure the foot opposite of the throwing hand (I.E. left foot if throwing right hook) doesn't plant flat and steal the power from the punch.



Thats some solid advice there.
That definately deserves some props



Agreed 100% props
905010
4/30/08 8:26:45PM
My instuctor tells me to transfer my body weight while throwing the hook. Also, to try to use less arm when you are throwing it in tight. The power should come from the hips like most strike's, but the best way to perfect is to keep practicing on a heavy bag. be sure you are doing the technique right though.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oh7eUPrtWDc

This is a pretty good vid. for thechnique.

The_Ho_Bag
4/30/08 8:31:30PM

Posted by 905010

My instuctor tells me to transfer my body weight while throwing the hook. Also, to try to use less arm when you are throwing it in tight. The power should come from the hips like most strike's, but the best way to perfect is to keep practicing on a heavy bag. be sure you are doing the technique right though.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oh7eUPrtWDc

This is a pretty good vid. for thechnique.




^^ my trainer kinda says the same thing =] hes current ISKA world champ 172

he says keep your Thumb up so u dont break your knuckles b/c some guys like do hook with your hands turned in and he says you break your knuckles easier and also he says to pivot your front font
Mastodon2
5/1/08 3:32:24PM
I don't have time to make as indepth a replay as I could, so I'll get to the point.

You can train your neck stronger with special weighted headstraps, but improper use can injure the neck, and no one is really sure how beneficial it is to improving your chin. Your time is much better spent improving your footwork, headmovement and blocking. Remember, step out of the way of the strike if you can, failing that try and weave out of the way of it. If you can't even do that, block it. Blocking is a last line of defence, footwork conquers all. It not only evades the strike, but it sets you up for a counter combo.

If your head hooks are weak you are probably throwing them too far out. The hook is a very short range punch that is supposed to come across, rather than being some looping bomb that will land miles away. The apex of power in a hook is when your fist is travelling horizontally, nearly parallel to your chest. Have your thumb pointed skywards as your throw the punch, then turn it in towards your chest at the last moment. Gets a little more snap on your punch and adds mustard. You can see when people get tired their technique goes, they stop twisting their core and doing the arm twist on their hooks and the power is sapped out of them. Maintain technique even when you are getting tired and I'm sure your hooks will become monsters.

As for kicking, I can head kick with the shin, and I use the Peter Aerts method. This involves my shin hitting them in a line4 across their chin and ear, and my instep hooks around the back of their head upon landing the kick. This creates a huge, weighty impact, even if you don't lash the kick out at full speed, and the hooking of your foot around their head will help pull them off balance, helping you score easy downs if you don't KO them. If your instep is hurting you have either a weak instep, of you are hitting them with the instep too much. Cro Cop is an instep kicker but his foot gets hurt. It's better to kick with the shin if you can. Just keep practising your high kicks and the flexibility should come. I was stiff as old cardboard before starting Muay Thai, but I quickly got some pretty good flexibility. I didn't do any special stretching routine outside of our training sessions, repetition of high kick drills and shadowboxing gave me all the range I needed. If you never get to the point of having enough range to hit the head with your shin and hook your instep in, you may have to rely on instep kicking, or not kicking the head at all, neither of which is ideal.
bustin_mma
5/10/08 2:41:02AM
hey man headaches are just part of learning to how to get hit. when i first started boxing i got the exact same thing. a decent part of being able to take a good shot is conditioning your head and face. once you get used to getting hit constintlay try to spar a little harder every time untill you get used to it cause if your planing on fighting mma your gonna get hit with punches and kicks that have bad intentions on them. so just keep your chin down and take em with a grain of salt and youll toughen up in no time. it worked for me, works for this guy too
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The-Don
6/23/08 12:02:05PM
Something I have read on some of the boxing forums is mouth gaurds... they can affect how a shot to the chin effects the head when your hit... if your mouth gaurd allows your teeth to be too close together when you bite down it allows a greater energy transfer throgh the jaw bones into the skull and the brain area you want a mouth gaurd that will give some seperation to the teeth but still feels comfortable.. this will reduce the energy transfer as it creates a bit of a space between the jaw bone and skull and acts like a shock absorpber..
fedorwins1
6/23/08 2:06:27PM
Hands up, chin down, relax, breath in and out your nose and exhale through your mouth while clenching your teeth when you throw a strike, and your shins are gonna hurt until they become conditioned.

Maybe the problem with your hooks and power is because your using your shoulders, use your hips for hooks (well every puch actually).
VictimSix
6/24/08 3:08:50AM

Posted by Jackelope
Another thing I would like to add about hooks is to make sure the foot opposite of the throwing hand (I.E. left foot if throwing right hook) doesn't plant flat and steal the power from the punch.


Just wanted to quote this because it's something alot of people forget to do when they shadowbox or hit bags. Then they build a very bad habit. My foot work isn't the best so when I'm not in any real danger I tend to flatten my feet a bit but once a relase a punch I always remember to elevate my heel. My sparring partners say I hit pretty hard but I think it's due more to proper footwork then my actual strenghth.

Also just something to throw out I always imagine my powerpunches going threw the persons head. Not stoping at the side of their face. People that are deemed "featherfisted" (in the case of some of my sparring partners) feel like they are stoping their punch when they hit you. I dono if that makes sense but follow threw on your punches (along with the other sound advise in this thread) and you might start to notice a difference.

Also the sad thruth is most of this just takes time and hard work.
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